Taking Care of Ourselves and Others: Preventing Suicide

Two celebrities took their lives in May 2018 – designer Kate Spade and chef Anthony Bourdain. Suicide is a cause of death that is both preventable and on the rise. According to the CDC, suicide rates in this country increased by 25% between 1999 and 2016. 

In times like these, where suicide is once again a topic of national conversation, we must be vigilant about the threat of contagion. This is a real and dangerous phenomenon that leads to a measurable spike in suicides following significant media exposure and public discussion of prominent suicides.

This happened in my small town in Connecticut. Several years ago a popular and well-known athlete hung himself in the family home only to be discovered by his younger brother. The news of his death spread like wildfire through the town. It was a tragedy felt by all. Within 24 hours, a second boy took his life in the same manner. His mother was in another part of the house at the time. Within two days following the second suicide, a third child, a girl, attempted to end her life but failed, thankfully. These children attended the same school and were very close in age. As a result, all of the children in the school were closely monitored for fear that there was a “suicide pact.” 

To halt the spread of suicidal ideation, and to care for ourselves, our loved ones, and our neighbors effectively, we must be fully informed about the specific ways in which we can help prevent suicide. Here are some tips for winning the fight against suicide. First, learn the risk factors. There are a number of factors that can place an individual at increased risk of suicide. If you or someone you know has one or more of these risk factors, proactive and preventative measures are even more important. These risk facts include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • History of depression or other serious mental health conditions
  • Serious physical health concerns such as pain, chronic conditions, and the like
  • History of prior suicide attempts or a family history of suicide
  • Stressful life events such as financial strain, divorce, loss of a loved one, relocating to an unfamiliar place, job loss, and natural disaster
  • Traumatic life events or history such as bullying, physical abuse and sexual assault
  • Access to firearms or other lethal weapons
  • Impaired judgment due to substance abuse such as drugs or alcohol
  • Past or current work in a high-risk industry such as military veterans, healthcare workers, or farmers
  • Heavy exposure to suicides such as first responders  

Second, watch for the signs. If you suspect that a loved one or neighbor is at risk for suicide, watch for these warning signs:

  • Words that express a desire to kill oneself, even in a joking manner, a feeling of hopelessness, having no reason to live, being a burden on others, or feeling trapped in a difficult situation
  • Behaviors such as increased use of substances such as drugs or alcohol, looking for suicide tips or methods online or in conversation with others, withdrawing from favorite activities, isolating from family or friends, sleep changes, giving away prized possession, or saying goodbye 
  • Moods such as depression, anxiety, loss of interest, irritability, shame, rage or uncontrollable anger, agitation, or a sudden sense of relief after a prolonged depression
  • Mood changes, including a sudden elevation in mood
  • Rage or uncontrollable anger

Third, don’t be afraid to start a conversation with someone who is exhibiting the warning signs and may be at risk for suicide. When you’ve identified risk factors and/or warning signs, don’t be afraid to initiate a conversation to directly address the issue with the person. The following tips from the Suicide Prevention Lifeline may be helpful:

  • Be direct. Talk openly and matter-of-factly about suicide
  • Be willing to listen. Allow your expressions of feelings to show and accept the feelings that you are having while listing to your loved one or neighbor
  • Do not judge. Don’t debate whether suicide is right or wrong, or whether feelings are good or bad. Do not lecture on the value of life
  • Don’t agree to keep your concerns secret. Seek support from professionals or others
  • Offer hope that alternatives are available, not glib reassurance
  • Take action by removing weapons, pills, alcohol, and other means for acting on suicidal ideation 

Fourth, be proactive about your own emotional health. According to the Campaign for Change Director, there are five general habits that each of us should repeat consistently for good emotional health. They are:

  • Take care of yourself physically by eating healthfully, exercising regularly, and getting good sleep
  • Check in with family, friends, and counselors on a regular basis
  • Engage with others in a meaningful way. After all, you cannot be healthy if your relationships are unhealthy
  • Relax with mediation, gently activity, gardening, cooking, and other activities that bring you pleasure and gratification
  • Know the signs and symptoms of emotional suffering in yourself and others

Finally, stay informed and involved. Seek out additional resources to educate yourself on the ways that you can take action to help prevent suicide. If you or someone you know is in danger, take it seriously and act appropriately. 

  • Call 211 Infoline for the names of counselors and for guidance and support
  • Call (800) 273.8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Hotline (press 1 for veterans)
  • Call 911 if it is a true emergency requiring immediate response
  • Call (800) (On Facebook Messenger: using the “send message” button at facebook.com/crisistextline will connect you to a live crisis counselor

Take care of yourself and those around you . . .

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. I am not expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Tips for Interviewing: Boss Fit

In general, millenials state that open communication and support are the most important qualities in a manager/supervisor. However, individuals very different and have varied experiences, expectations, and goals. When considering whether a candidate is a good fit with the manager, the hiring manager will ask questions in the hope of understanding each candidate values and how those values match with the manager’s personal style and the job expectations. Source: Randstat’s Gen Z and Millennials Collide @ Work report, U.S. findings.

Questions the hiring manager may ask are the following questions:

  1. In your previous jobs, have you ever reported to more than one person at a time? How did you prioritize your work? How did this process work for you?
  2. Tell me about some constructive feedback you received from a manager. How did you react?
  3. In your most recent position, how much direction did you get from your immediate supervisor? do you feel that this level of supervision was sufficient, excessive, or not enough?
  4. Describe the best manager you’ve ever had. What did you appreciate the most about this person?
  5. Tell me about the manager who was the most effective in motivating you. What, specifically, inspired you?
  6. Give an example of a time when your manager did something that demotivated you. What was the situation and how did you react?
  7. Describe the manager for whom you least enjoyed working. What, specifically, did you dislike about the approach?

Hiring managers typically interview candidates who will work for others, not for themselves. As a result, the hiring manager is trying to compare the candidates stories and anedotes to what he or she understands about the position, the team, and the the manager’s leadership style. It is not an easy task to determine whether the manager (someone else) can effectively motivate the employee, deliver constructive feedback in a manner that will be accepted by the candidate, or provide the level of management the candidate will need and want.

Now, get to it . . .

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Tips for Interviewing: Company Fit

Interviewing is a skill that requires cultivation and on-going maintenance because one never knows what to expect when arriving at a company for an interview. The reason for this is that interviews are often the least disciplined component of the talent acquisition process. While recruiters and human resource managers who oversee talent acquisition are trained interviewers, many hiring managers are not. Worse, many hiring managers find the task to be unpleasant and grueling. Regardless of who is conducting the interview, most interviewers have the goal of determining if the candidate is a good fit for the company, for the leadership, and the job.

To determine whether a candidate is a good fit for the company, the interviewer may ask the following questions:

  1. What do you know about the company? What aspects of working at the company are most appealing to you?
  2. Of all the companies you’ve worked for so far in your career, which one(s) did you enjoy working for and why?
  3. Where did you experience the best teamwork? What made that team successful?
  4. Provide an example of someone with whom you found it diffcult to work? Why? What did you do, if anything, to make the situation better (more workable)?
  5. Describe a time when you had difficulty accomplishing a task. What obstacles did you encounter? Who did you go to for help?
  6. Describe a time in your previous job where you were asked to do something which you didn’t agree. What did you do?
  7. Describe the different workspace arrangments you’ve experienced (open space, cubicle, private office). Which one did you prefer and why?

In general,  employees who are able to function well in teams and organizations will have had mostly positive experiences with past employers. A candidate who will fit into the work environment, work well with other members of the team, and respect company values is likely to use the word “we” more than the word “I” when describing team projects  and accomplishments and will demonstrate a measure of understanding and ownership for team objectives.

Conflict or disagreement between colleagues are bound to occur in a work setting. The ability to resolve these situations constructively is a valuable skill for employees to have and an asset to the team.

Both Gen Z and Millennials cite the people they work with as the number one attribute that enables them to do their best work. During the interview process, it is likely that candidates will be offered the opportunity to meet some of the members of the team to measure compatibility. Source: Randstad’s Gen Z and Millennials Collide @ Work report, U.S. findings.

Now, get to it . . .

key

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Building Your Network

Develop your network of contacts by:

  • Making a list of all the people you know personally, professionally, or from school.
    • Include family members, classmates, neighbors, your kids’ teachers, co-workers, professional or social organizations, people you speak to at the dog park, who go to the same salon, etc.
    • Research contact information on-line to find out how to communicate with the people on your list. Some ways to do this are to:
      • Join LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com) and set up a profile. Don’t just phone it in, really spend some time building an awesome profile.
      • Start a Facebook account (www.facebook.com) for professional contacts and networking. Include job titles, former employers, the names of schools you attended, and organizational affiliations.
        • If you have a personal Facebook account, consider using the available privacy settings to close your account to anyone outside your personal circle.
        • Do not post anything that might make you look bad. Stay positive, avoid controversial topics such as politics, religion, and money.
      • Network with potential contacts, business owners, and others Twitter. Twitter is a social networking site that allows people to share information through 140-character messages called tweets.
    • In addition to providing the means to research your contacts, these activities will increase your web presence and provide benefits such as 24 hour, 7 day a week accessibility and an easy and inexpensive way to market your brand.
  • Setting a weekly goal for networking contacts. Let your contacts know that you are looking for a job and need their help. Be clear as to the type of work you want and the skills and qualifications you bring to an organization. Have your networking or elevator speech ready whether you are emailing, calling, or run into a contact at the coffee shop.
  • Asking your contacts for leads to expand your network. For example:
    • Do you know of anyone with skills and interests similar to mine?
    • Do you have contact with anyone in a similar business or litigation area as me?
    • Do you know of anyone interested in working with or hiring a person with my skills and experience?
  • Contacting anyone identified by your contacts and ask them the same questions and more, like:
    • What separates you from the competition?
    • What significant changes have you seen take place in your professional area of expertise through the years?
    • What was the strangest or funniest incident you experienced in your practice or business?
  • Trying to get at least one name from each of your contacts and then emailing or calling the new contacts. Remember to invite each contact to connect with you on LinkedIn.

There is no end to the number of different networking building strategies available to you and any one of these strategies could serve you well. If one strategy is not working, don’t be afraid to try something else. You will find that some methods are more effective than others.

I hope that this posting will help you to spend more of your time using super effective networking methods. To get started, be brave and take the first step today.

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Building Your Brand

Establishing your personal brand is about identifying your characteristics, assets, strengths, and skills as an individual. Branding is a mix of how you present yourself and how others see you. It is important to be aware of how you are viewed by the personal and professional contacts in your network.

There are three key steps to building your personal brand.

  • Building self-awareness:
    1. Reflect on your past work experiences, analyze career high points and low, and idenify the common themes, habits, and trends.
    2. Focus on what was going on in your professional life at the time, the type of work you were doing, what the environment was like, and who you were working with at the time.
  • Communicate your value:
    1. Practice describing your strengths and how you use them in your professional life and communicate the value you bring to the organization, work, and co-workers, and clients.
    2. Ask yourself, what are you known for, what are you good at, what energizes and motivates you, how do you like to work (independently or as part of a team, at home or in the office, etc), and what do you want to avoid?

  • Build your reputation:
    1. Find ways to connect with the individuals and communities that fit your strengths and career aspirations. Ask your network to make introductions on your behalf whenever possible to extend your opportunities and network.
    2. Think practically about who can held you further your career aspirations, how you can network with these folks more effectively, and how to gain visibility with decision makers.

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Tax Year 2016 – What’s new?

The IRS will begin accepting individual electronic and paper tax returns on January 23, 2017. If you file electronically, refunds will be electronically deposited to your bank account in 10 to 12 days from the date of processing. The deadline for filing individual tax returns (Form 1040) is April 18, 2017.

The standard mileage rate deduction for the cost of operating your vehicle for business purposes is 54 cents per mile. In addition to mileage, you may deduct the cost of tolls, parking, property taxes, and interest.

If you use your vehicle for medical purposes, you can deduct 19 cents per mile. The standard mileage rate for use of your vehicle for volunteer services for a charity is 14 cents per mile.

You can deduct the part of your medical and dental expenses that is  greater than 10% of your adjusted gross income. If you or your spouse is age 65 or older, you can deduct expenses that are greater than 7.5% of your adjusted gross income.

IRA and Retirement Account Contributions to Roth and Traditional IRA’s remain at $5,500. If you turned age 50 or older in 2016, you may contribute an additional $1,000. Contributions to 401(k), 403(b), or 457 retirement plans remain at $18,000. If you turned 50 or older in 2016, you may contribute an additional $6,000. Self-employment Pension Plan (SEP) contributions remain at $53,000 for 2016.

  • Please review your beneficiary designations. It is necessary for you to have named a primary beneficiary(ies) and contingent beneficiary(ies) for all of your IRA and retirement accounts.

The maximum Health Savings Account (HSA) contribution increased to $3,350 for individuals and $6,750 for family coverage. If you are age 55 or older, you can contribute an additonal $1,000. The deadline for contributing to your 2016 HSA is April 18, 2017.

Charitable deductions must be supported by documentation for every dollar you claim. For donations of more than $250, documentation must be obtained from the charity. If you are not sure of the value of your donation you can go to www.satruck.com or www.itsdeductible.com for the information. The IRS has been auditing tax returns that list non-cash contributions so be sure to have the appropriate documentation and valuation. Please note that there is no deduction for the value of the time you contribute to a charity.

You can obtain a record of your past tax returns (called “transcripts”) from the IRS. The website is www.irs.gov/Individuals/Get-Transcript.

In addition to any 1099 (employment income) and W-2 (wage statement), you will need the following documentation to file your individual (Form 1040) tax return:

  • Form 1095 / proof of health insurance:
    • Evidence that every member of your household reported on your tax return was covered by health insurance for 2016 and that the insurance meets the Minimum Essential Requirements of coverage. Evidence is Form 1095-A received from the insurance exchange or Form 1095-B or 1095-C received from your insurance carrier or employer. Your insurance carrier or employer is required to send Form 1095-B or 1095-C by March 2, 2017.
    • If you do not have the required insurance coverage you will need to get an Excemption Certificate Number (ECN).
  • Form 1098-T / Tuition and Fees deduction:
    • Generally, qualified expenses for education tax credits include tuition, books, supplies, computer for the enrollment or attendance at eligible post-secondary educational institutions (including colleges, universities, and trade schools). The expenses paid during the tax year must be for an academic period that begins in the same tax year or an academic period that begins in the first three months of the following tax year.
    • The following expenses do not qualify for the educaitonal tax credit:
      • Room and board, transportation, insurance, and medical expenses
      • Student fees unless required as a condition of enrollment or attendance
    • You will receive a 1098-T from the educational institution that shows the costs paid during the year. Often the information reported in the 1098-T is not accurate and the IRS has been auditing tax returns that report educational tax credits. You will  need to keep a copy of the transcript of the costs of the educational institution for verification.

Now, get to it . . .

 

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Take the 12 Days of Wellness Challenge

We are in the holiday season, where we tend to fall out of our regular routines and give in to holiday temptations. You may already have sweets and treats in your office. You may be rushing on your free time and after work to buy gifts or bake holiday treats. You have to schedule “me” time into your day.

Take the 12 days of wellness challenge to keep your mind focused and your body in good health during the holidays. To participate, complete one wellness activity each work day from the wellness activity list below.

There are four (4) different categories of wellness: fitness, nutrition , well-being, and community. Your goal is to complete three activities from each of the four (4) wellness categories. That is just one activity each day for 12 (work) days.

Fitness:

  • Walk a flight of stairs twice in one day
  • Take a fitness class at a local gym or wellness center
  • Stretch your shoulders, chest, and back at your desk twice during the workday
  • Stand up from your desk and  move once every hour
  • Walk 20 minutes during your lunch or break
  • Do 12 “chair squats”: stand up from your chair without using your arms for assistance, sit down without using your arms for assistance, repeat
  • Do at least 30 minutes of continuous cardio axercise
  • Ask a friend or co-worker to join you in one of the these fitness challenges

Nutrition:

  • Eat two (2) servings of fruit during your workday
  • Eat a balanced lunch containing a protein, whole grain, and a fruit or vegetable
  • Eat a helathy snack in the mid-moring and afternoon
  • Drink an additional glass of water during your workday
  • Bring a healthy holiday treat to share with your co-workers
  • Eat two (2) servings of vegetables during your workday
  • Do not eat any sweets or desserts for 24 hours

Community:

  • Do something nice for a co-worker or friend
  • Decorate your office or work space with holiday cheer
  • Donate a gift to a community toy drive
  • Donate food to your local food bank
  • Thank a co-worker and let him/her know how he/she has helped you or your department this past year
  • Clean or organize a shared work space or staff break area

Well-Being:

  • Practice deep breathing for one minute twice during your workday — breathe in through your nose, hold your breathe for a count of five (5), and then breath out of your mouth
  • Rest your eyes from the computer screen by looking in the distance or closing them for 30 seconds every hour
  • Share a positive news story when discussing current events with your co-workers
  • Stop and enjoy the beautiful view out of the window on your office
  • Eat lunch away from your desk or worksite
  • Wake up 15 minutes early and take time to relax before starting your workday

Be healthy and happy this holiday season. Now, get to it . . .

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Protect Yourself from Phishing During the Holidays

At the holidays, inboxes everywhere are flooded with shipping updates, order confirmations, and eCards from family and friends. Attackers take advantage of the deluge of emails by sending creative phishing emails designed to catch you off guard. From fake charity websites to malicious eCards, cyber attacks spike during the holiday season.

WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR:

Shipping Updates: Fake shipping notifications increase each year around the holidays. With so many online orders being shipped, people may be more susceptible to clicking a link about a status update or a failed delivery. Even if the message looks valid, go to the store/company website directly and enter the tracking number yourself. Call the shipping company for assistance using the contact information on their website.

Fake Order Confirmations: Attackers also take advantage of the increase in year-end online shopping on the most popular shopping days of the year — Black Friday and Cyber Monday. During this hectic time, you may be more likely to click an order confirmation link from your favorite store/company without questioning it. Keep track of your orders so you know what emails to expect and which to avoid.

Holiday eCards: Another popular lure that attackers use is sending fake eCards with malicious files attached. Although a cute eCard may look innocent, never click on a link from an unknown sender.

Charity Phishing Scams: Phishers often impersonate charities and send emails asking for year-end donations. Before entering your personal information and making a donation, ensure that the site is legitimate and that you recognize the domain. Also, ensure that the URL, shows as “https://”, indicating that the connection is secure.

Unsolicited Offers and Deals: Around the holidays, your inboxes are probably overflowing with messages about irresistible deals and promotions. Attackers often people target people with end-of-the-year giveaways and contests. Don’t click on any offers from an unknown sender. Instead, verify that the offer is legitimate by going to the retailer’s website and shopping there directly. Remember — if it seems too good to be true, it probably is.

Quick Tips — Keep these tips in mind to help you identify phishing emails in your inboxes:

  • Think Twice. Read emails thoroughly and be wary of offers that seem to good to be true.
  • Bookmark Shopping Sites. Avoid using search engines to find deals. Using trusted shopping sites can help reduce the chance of landing on a malicious website.
  • Look At the Domain Name. Some attackers will modify domains to catch you off guard. For example, if the correct domain is www.example.com, the phishers may register as “examp1e.com” or “example.co”.
  • Always Verify. Verify that the email is from the real sender before engaging. If you have any questions, call, or email the sender to confirm that the email is legitimate.

DID YOU KNOW?  You can safely check where a link goes without clicking on it:

  • Desktop — OSx and Windows — Hover your cursor over the link to view the URL.
  • Mobile devices — Android, iOS, Windows — Touch and hold the link until a pop-up menu appears.

Now, get to it . . .

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Are You Moving Towards a More Organized Life?

I don’t know about you but I feel busier than ever.  My family, friends, neighbors, and co-workers also seem to be in a great rush.

With all the pressure to GET THINGS DONE, I am often distracted, preoccupied, and worried. I start projects but do not finish them. I spend way too much time worrying rather than organizing and planning for the future. And my payoff for all of this stress is poor time management and a shortage of “me” time.

The following are some simple things that you can do to reverse the causes of disorganization and achieve a more organized life:

Worry less, set goals. A goal is more than a statement of something you would like to achieve. A goal is a plan that provides the framework of what and how you will achieve your vision. Behavioral goals are how-tos that help you reach your outcome goals. Outcome goals are aimed specifically at achieving a result.

Having a clear picture of your desired future will provide direction and pave a clear path to success.

  1. Establish a clear vision
  2. Create short-term (three-month) and long-term (yearly) goals
  3. Identify obstacles and strategies
  4. Define your motivation
  5. Set smaller, weekly goals

SMART goals:  Specific and small, Measurable, Action-based, Realistic, and Time-oriented

Examples:  Your outcome goal is to be in better health. Your behavorial goals are to exercise more, eat better, and avoid stress so that you achieve your goal of better health. Your outcome goal is to save more money. Your behavioral goals are to reduce expenses and spend less money.

Organize and plan ahead. You may find more “you” time if you are more organized and plan ahead. Use whatever you can to keep your organized. Think about the next day and what you need to do today in order to make tomorrow easier and more successful.

 

  • Use technology. Schedule important dates and times on your calendar, set email reminders, utilize planning websites. Use financial programs for organizing your bills and monitoring spending.
  • Purchase an organizer. Note pads, boxes, folders, shelves, calendars, planners, etc. will help you get and stay organized.
  • Make lists and stick to them.
  • Carry your “to-do” list with you.

Manage your time effectively. We misuse time when:

  • Our goals and objectives are unclear,
  • We are uncertain about our priorities,
  • We are tired or have low energy,
  • Misuse down time,
  • Have a perectionist mentality, or
  • Cannot say “no.”

To better manage your time:

  • Establish priorities. List your priorities in order of importance.
  • Use the 80-20 rule: spend the most time on what’s most important
  • Avoid perfectionism. Do the best you can, given the circumstances. Set goals that are realistic and achievable.
  • Put off procrastination.
  • Work on challenging tasks first. Tackle your hardest or most time consuming objective/task first. Do not leave it for the end of the day or the end of the week.
  • Do not spread yourself too thin. Learn to say “no” to your unrealistic expectations and to the unnecessary requests or obligations of others. Learn to set healthy boundaries.
  • Build flexibility into your schedule.
  • Be prepared for delays and use delays to your advantage. Bring work or reading material to appointments so that you will have something to do if people you are meeting with are delayed.
  • Get up earlier. An extra hour every day for a year is the equivalent of nine (9) weeks.
  • Delegate. Be willing to give up some control to others.

Make time for you. Find ways to recapture energy, practice stress-relieving activities, exercise, socialize, and enjoy your life.

  • Balance activities that require energy with time to renew energy.
  • Build rituals into your day that renew your energy
    • At home — list to soothing music, read, or soak in the tub
    • Work — take mini breaks every 60 to 90 minutes
    • Leisure — exercise, garden, dance, take walks
  • Do not over-book yourself.
  • Schedule time for leisure activities such as exercise, a night out with friends, or vacations/weekend getaways
  • Prepare ahead of time for leisure
    • pack a gym bag and keep it in your car
    • email friends/make reservations
    • schedule time off from work

What to do today to get moving toward your more organized life:

  • Achieve at least one major objective each day
  • Set time limits for each task
  • Eliminate one time-wasting or unimportant activity this week
  • Build “you” time into each day
  • Apply one time-saving tip you today

Now, get to it . . .

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Retirement Savings 2017

Looking forward to 2017 you should review your retirement plans to determine what changes, if any, you want to make. Individual retirement plans (IRAs and 401(k)s) are two of the most common defined contribution plans and offer tax-advantaged retirement savings.

The annual limit for contributions for traditional and Roth IRAs for 2017 is $6,000. People age 50 or older in 2017 can contribute an additional $1,000 for a total potential contribution of $7,000.

The annual imit for contributions for 401(k), 403(b), and 457(b) plans is $18,000. Workers age 50 or older in 2017 are permitted an additional catch-up contribution of $6,000 for a total potential contribution of $24,000.

401(k) v. IRA:

  • 401(k)
    • For employees of companies that offer such plans
    • Employer may match the contribitions up to 6% of salary
    • Pay taxes later (upon withdrawal during retirement)
  • Individual Retirement Plan (IRA)
    • Roth IRA
      • Pay taxes now
      • Tax-free withdrawals of contributions only (not earnings or interest on contributions) at any time
    • Traditional IRA
      • Pay taxes later
      • Receive potential tax deductions now

Now, get to it . . .

key

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.