Category Archives: Getting to Know Yourself

Building Your Network

Develop your network of contacts by:

  • Making a list of all the people you know personally, professionally, or from school.
    • Include family members, classmates, neighbors, your kids’ teachers, co-workers, professional or social organizations, people you speak to at the dog park, who go to the same salon, etc.
    • Research contact information on-line to find out how to communicate with the people on your list. Some ways to do this are to:
      • Join LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com) and set up a profile. Don’t just phone it in, really spend some time building an awesome profile.
      • Start a Facebook account (www.facebook.com) for professional contacts and networking. Include job titles, former employers, the names of schools you attended, and organizational affiliations.
        • If you have a personal Facebook account, consider using the available privacy settings to close your account to anyone outside your personal circle.
        • Do not post anything that might make you look bad. Stay positive, avoid controversial topics such as politics, religion, and money.
      • Network with potential contacts, business owners, and others Twitter. Twitter is a social networking site that allows people to share information through 140-character messages called tweets.
    • In addition to providing the means to research your contacts, these activities will increase your web presence and provide benefits such as 24 hour, 7 day a week accessibility and an easy and inexpensive way to market your brand.
  • Setting a weekly goal for networking contacts. Let your contacts know that you are looking for a job and need their help. Be clear as to the type of work you want and the skills and qualifications you bring to an organization. Have your networking or elevator speech ready whether you are emailing, calling, or run into a contact at the coffee shop.
  • Asking your contacts for leads to expand your network. For example:
    • Do you know of anyone with skills and interests similar to mine?
    • Do you have contact with anyone in a similar business or litigation area as me?
    • Do you know of anyone interested in working with or hiring a person with my skills and experience?
  • Contacting anyone identified by your contacts and ask them the same questions and more, like:
    • What separates you from the competition?
    • What significant changes have you seen take place in your professional area of expertise through the years?
    • What was the strangest or funniest incident you experienced in your practice or business?
  • Trying to get at least one name from each of your contacts and then emailing or calling the new contacts. Remember to invite each contact to connect with you on LinkedIn.

There is no end to the number of different networking building strategies available to you and any one of these strategies could serve you well. If one strategy is not working, don’t be afraid to try something else. You will find that some methods are more effective than others.

I hope that this posting will help you to spend more of your time using super effective networking methods. To get started, be brave and take the first step today.

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Building Your Brand

Establishing your personal brand is about identifying your characteristics, assets, strengths, and skills as an individual. Branding is a mix of how you present yourself and how others see you. It is important to be aware of how you are viewed by the personal and professional contacts in your network.

There are three key steps to building your personal brand.

  • Building self-awareness:
    1. Reflect on your past work experiences, analyze career high points and low, and idenify the common themes, habits, and trends.
    2. Focus on what was going on in your professional life at the time, the type of work you were doing, what the environment was like, and who you were working with at the time.
  • Communicate your value:
    1. Practice describing your strengths and how you use them in your professional life and communicate the value you bring to the organization, work, and co-workers, and clients.
    2. Ask yourself, what are you known for, what are you good at, what energizes and motivates you, how do you like to work (independently or as part of a team, at home or in the office, etc), and what do you want to avoid?

  • Build your reputation:
    1. Find ways to connect with the individuals and communities that fit your strengths and career aspirations. Ask your network to make introductions on your behalf whenever possible to extend your opportunities and network.
    2. Think practically about who can held you further your career aspirations, how you can network with these folks more effectively, and how to gain visibility with decision makers.

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Do You Have A Career Portfolio?

240_f_46888137_calhybynkutbp8xlv42olsgduxocjrpm-2A career portfolio is a collection of records in a paper or digital format that describes who you are and what you are capable of doing with much more detail than a resume. Think of it as your individual professional marketing plan.

You can hand pick the records that showcase your professional strengths, interests, and accomplishments and include these documents in your portfolio. These records may include your resume, mission statement, personal goals, graphs, charts, customer service comments/feedback, peer reviews, certifications, licenses, performance evaluations, writing samples/samples of your work, lists of awards, public/community service etc. If done properly, your career portfolio will provide an incredibly complete picture of you as a worker, much more so than a resume could ever do.

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Don’t send your career portfolio to every potential employer or with every resume you send in response to a job lead. If a potential employer shows interest in you, you should send anything from your career portfolio that showcases your skills and indicates that you are the person for the position.

Now, get to it . . .

 

Source: Quick Online Job Search, Michael Farr and The Editors @ JIST, 2011 ed.

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This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Job Search Step 1: Define Your Ideal Job

Job search is evolving at break neck speed as technology give us faster and easier ways of going about the process of finding a job. To “score” a job interview, you must make a job out of getting a job. The seven steps for an online job search are:

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  1. Define your ideal job;
  2. Identify your skills online;
  3. Use online social networking sites to network for jobs;
  4. Find job openings online;
  5. Organize your job search;
  6. Use your resume online; and
  7. Correspond with employers via email.

Step 1: In order to DEFINE YOUR IDEAL JOB you need to know yourself and what you want to do professionally. There are several factors to consider when thinking about the job you want. These are:

  • Your education, knowledge and strengths,
  • the company culture you want to work in,
  • the type of people you want to work with,
  • what city or geographic area you want to work in,
  • how much money you need to make,
  • how much responsibilitiy you will accept, and
  • any other person values.

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To help you define your ideal job, consider the following questions. When you know what you want to do the task of finding a position will be infinitely simplier.

You may have already done this work if you have been following my blog and doing the exercises I published last month in the Getting to Know Yourself series.

1. What type of special knowledge do you have? Are you adapt at fixing things, keeping financial records, or cooking food? Write down the things that you know from school, training, hobbies, family experiences, and any other sources.



 

2. With what types of people do you prefer to work? Do you excel alongside competitive people, hardworking folks, creative personalities, relaxed people, or some other type of co-worker? List the types of people you prefer.



3. What type of work environment do you prefer? Do you like to work outside, inside, in a quiet or a busy place, in a clean or messy/cluttered space, or do you want a window with a nice view? List the types of environments you prefer.



4. Where do you want your next job to be? If you are open to living and working anywhere, what would your ideal community be? In what region of the country, what part of the state, or what city? Near a bus line, close to childcare, urban or rural?



5. What benefits or income do you hope to earn in your next position? Some people will take less money or fewer benefits if they like a job for other reasons or if they have been out of work or underemployed for awhile. Think about the minimum you will accept and what you hope to earn eventually.



6. How much and what types of responsbility are you looking for? Do you want to work by yourself, be part of a group, or be in charge? If you want to be in charge, how many people are you willing to supervise or support?



7. What values are important or have meaning to you? Do you have important values you would prefer to include in considering your ideal job? For example, some people want a position that allows them to help others, protect the environment, offers a variety of tasks, allow a lot of leisure time, gain power, prestige, or exposure, or care for animals or plants. Write down what is important to you and how you might include this in your next job.



 

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It is unusual to find a description of a job that meets all of the criteria you just listed above. For this reason, you should look for a position that meets the most important of the criteria listed above or that meets most of the criteria.

 

To help you find your ideal job, write a brief description of the responsibilities and duties of such a position. Do not worry about the job title, whether you have the necessary experience, or other practical matters for this task.




Now, get to it . . .

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This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Source: Quick Online Job Search, Michael Farr and The Editors @ JIST, 2011 ed.

You Are The Boss Of Your Work Happiness

Good days don’t just happen, they are made.

Caroline Webb, an expert in behavioral science and author of the book, How to Have a Good Day, believes that “there is so much people can do to create good moments in every day. Even if you can’t make a really unpleasant job feel wonderful, you can learn to work within the constraints you have to make a situation better.” Source: Cosmopolitan magazine, February 2016.

fotolia_74038494Here are Caroline Webb’s 12 tips for achieving happiness in the workplace:

  1. Start your day by setting an intention. Setting an intention is the process of deciding what you want to achieve, forming a clear picture of it, and then allowing your subconscious to lead you to it. Setting an intention activates your power and energy toward the achievement of your goals.
    • Each morning, think about the day ahead.
    • Acknowledge your feelings — are you grumpy, sad, happy, expectant, etc? — so that you can understand how you are affected by your feelings.
    • Write down your intention so that you can remind yourself of it throughout the day.
  2. Plan a peak. Decide what you are most looking forward to each day, however small or mundane. According to Webb, “small becomes bigger when you think about it.”fotolia_72016274
  3. Imagine your best you. Envision the most important task of the day and picture yourself successfully completing that task. Visualize each step you will take and the potential outcome.
  4. Protect your thinking time. Set aside uninterrupted, distraction-free, time to work on your most complex or difficult task. Group similar activities together, like answering phone calls or responding to emails, working on finances, or preparing for meetings. Complete one activity before moving on to the next. fotolia_84576891
  5. Express appreciation. Compliment or thank someone and tell them why you are praising them. Noticing that you have made someone’s day better will boost your own morale.
  6. Head off work conflicts. Nothing spoils your day like a work interaction gone horribly wrong. Stay calm and acknowledge the other person’s frustration. Offer solutions to resolve the conflict in a way that benefits both of you.
  7. Connect with a friend. Use your time on the bus or train, on a work break, or at lunch to network or connect with other people. You don’t have to meet in person, you can use technology to text, email, or video chat.fotolia_100527985
  8. Fake a good mood. Smiling is the new power pose. According to Webb, breathing slowly and smiling can trick your brain into a better mood.
  9. Label your frustrations. Writing down a problem will help you to move past it. When you feel angry or upset, write out the facts of the situation and how you feel with stark objectivity and honesty. Then read what you have written and decide what your best self would do to resolve the situation.
  10. Get out of your chair. Movement improves mood, memory and focus. Keep it simple – take the stairs, do stretches, walk the long-way to the water fountain or restroom, sit on an exercise ball for an hour, do lunges in your cubicle, etc.  fotolia_94580166
  11. Express gratitude. Identify three things from your day for which you are grateful – no matter how small or mundane. Write them down, tell them to your partner, or simply reflect on them in a quiet moment. You can keep a gratitude journal so that you can look back at all of the things for which you were grateful.
  12. Power down at night. Before bedtime, turn off the screens, put away your phone, and take off the headphones. Take a few minutes to do a calming activity like yoga or a crossword puzzle to wind down before bed so that you sleep restfully and wake refreshed.

You can find more information in Cosmopolitan magazine for February 2016 at pages 161 through 163.

Now, get to it . . .

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This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Knowing Yourself: Strategies for Resolving Conflict

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Conflicts with co-workers, supervisors, clients, customers, or vendors are not uncommon in the workplace and can be caused by all kinds of issues. The conflicts may be short-lived and easy to resolve, or they might be highly-charged and confrontational disagreements. No mattter the type of conflict, the outcome will be greatly influenced by the way in which you react.

 

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Being able to successfully resolve conflicts should make your interactions at work more productive and enjoyable. Below are several strategies to help you the next time you face a personal or workplace conflict.

  1. Once you have acknowledged a conflict, there are 4 possible options to resolve it:
    • Win-Win: you and the other person both get something you want or need.
    • Win-Lose: You get something you want or need but the other person does not.
    • Lose-Win: You do not get what you want or need but the other person does.
    • Lose-Lose: Neither you nor the other person get what you want or need.
  2. A conflict is only resolved when everyone is satisfied with the outcome. In other words, only a Win-Win option will successfully resolve a conflict.

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Negotiation is required for a win-win solution. That means talking to the person with whom you have a conflict or are in disagreement. Negotiation can be extremely challenging because you may feel strongly about the issue at hand or you may be extremely frustrated with the other person. And the other person may feel the same way.

 

The following are tips to help you work successfully with others to achieve a win-win solution to a conflict that meets the needs or wants of all involved:

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  1. Be calm and objective. Don’t attempt to talk to the person if you are upset. Wait until you are calm and relaxed before trying to resolve the conflict.
  2. Focus on the problem, not on the person. The disagreement is not about the other person, its about something you want or need. Explain the conflict objectively without accusation or supposition. Use explicit details and examples to make your explanation clear.
  3. Listen to the other person’s explanation without judgment or interruption. Really listen to the other person and hear his or her description of the conflict and explanation.
  4. Discuss options for settlement of the conflict. Talk to the other person to try to find a solution so that you both get something you want or need. Recognize that it may not be possible for both of you to get everything that you want. You may need to compromise to reach a win-win solution.
  5. Act on it. Once you idenitfy a win-win solution that is fair and reasonable, put it into practice. Check on the solution to make sure that it continues to meet your needs and wants. If not, negotiate a new or modified solution.

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SUMMARY

  • Acknowledge the conflict. Do not avoid it or denies its existence.
  • Think of ways to approach the conflict that could lead to a win-win solution. A win-win solution is one in which you and the other person both have some of your needs or wants met.
  • Negotiate a win-win solution in a calm and reasonable way. Speak honestly and listen openly and without judgement to the other person.
  • Make sure that the solution you choose continues to work. If necessary, renegotiate to modify the solution or to find another win-win solution.

Now, get to it . . .

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This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in CT. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Knowing Yourself: Resolving Conflict part 2

If you read the post I published yesterday, you know that conflict happens when one person wants or needs something that is contrary to the wants and needs of another person.

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Conflict can happen between individuals or groups of people in our professional lives . . .

 

 

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and in our personal lives.

Conflict can take many different forms. And once conflict is acknowledged, conflict can be handled in many different ways.

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  • Avoiding conflict or letting emotions control one’s response to conflict usually leads to additional or more intense conflict, including hostility and negative attitudes and morale.
  • Positive ways to respond to conflict are more likely to lead to a successful resolution of a disagreement. Further, a positive resolution to a conflict can lead to respect and understanding among employees and a much better outcome for all involved.

EXERCISE: Think back to how you resolved conflicts or disagreements with family, friends, and co-workers. Do you usually feel better or worse after the conflict is over? Why? Have you considered how you might improve your conflict resolution skills?

To help you answer these questions, pick two examples of conflicts you have experienced and answer the questions below:

First example:  A time I DID get what I wanted after a disagreement was . . .



I felt . . .



The other person or people probably felt . . . (you may think the person or people were satisfied with the outcome of the conflict when they were not. Think unemotionally and honestly about how the person or people reacted to you or interacted with you after the conflict to gauge how they may have felt about the outcome.)



I would / would not handle the disagreement differently now because . . .



 

Second example:  A time I DID NOT get what I wanted after a disagreement was . . .



I felt . . .



The other person or people probably felt . . . (you may think the person or people were satisfied with the outcome of the conflict when they were not. Think unemotionally and honestly about how the person or people reacted to you or interacted with you after the conflict to gauge how they may have felt about the outcome.)I would / would not handle the disagreement differently now because . . .



Now, get to it . . .

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This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in CT. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Knowing Yourself: Resolving Conflict

fotolia_73699781Wikipedia defines a workplace conflict as “a state of discord caused by the actual or perceived opposition of needs, values and interests between people working together.”

Workplace conflict occurs when one worker’s wants or needs do not match the wants or needs of another worker. Conflict can also occur between employees and supervisors, employees and customers, and employees and vendors/suppiers.

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Ignoring a conflict or denying that it exists can cause tension and turn a minor problem between employees into a major conflict that can affect productivity and morale. Workplace conflict can take many different forms.

Examples are:

  • differing goals or priorities,
  • distinctive styles, methods, or approaches to tasks, and
  • opposing personalities.

The ability to define and resolve conflicts can help you in all manner of personal and professional situations. Acknowledging these conflicts, although difficult at times, can help you to recognize their causes and identify constructive ways to resolve them.

Workplace conflict is stressful and difficult to manage. Rather than acknowledging a  conflict, some employees will deny the existence of the conflict. To do this, these employees may:

  • ignore the problem and hope that it will go away,
  • make excuses or try to justify the reason for the conflict, or
  • underestimate the extent of the conflict.

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These employees are making a mistake.

When employees refuse to acknowledge workplace conflicts, strong emotions such as anger, disappointment, frustration, and anxiety can build over time. Recognizing and acknowledging conflicts as they arise can control and keep minor workplace issues from growing into major ones.

If you find yourself involved in a workplace conflict you should acknowledge the conflict in order to bring it to a successful resolution. Acknowledging a conflict is a necessary step toward the goal of resolving it. To do this, you will need to:

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  1. Define the conflict clearly and objectively
    • Put aside emotions and any judgment about the other person involved in the conflictual situation,
    • Try to see the conflict from the other person’s point of view, and
    • Clearly and specifically identify the cause or causes of the conflict.
  2. Identify areas of agreement and disagreement
    • Identify understandings or goals that you and the other person share;
    • Identify areas of disagreement and contention, and
    • Answer the question, “How do we solve this conflict?
  3. Accurately restate the conflict using important details and examples
    • Once you undestand the conflict, its causes, and areas of agreement and disagreemment, you should restate the conflict in your own words to ensure your understanding of it, and
    • Objectively restate the conflict to the person or person you are having the conflict with to be sure that all people involved have the same understanding of the conflict. Use explicit details and examples to support your understanding of the conflict.

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Communication skills are critical for conflict resolution. Active listening during a conflict requires a great deal of concentration because anger and frustration can be distracting.

  1. Build on what you know. It is important to stop thinking about what you will say next and to put aside emotions so that you can focus on what the speaker is saying. Not listening can make a conflict worse.
  2. Develop your skills. Use listening strategies to identify and follow the speaker’s main points, identify the cause of the conflict, and figure out what is needed to resolve it.
    • Watch and listen for social cues, such as the speaker’s tone of voice, gestures, and other body language.
    • Listen for signal words and phrases that indicate order, cause and effect, or important facts.
    • Don’t be afraid to ask if you don’t know a word or its meaning.
  3. Finally, apply your knowledge to resolve the conflict. For example,
    • You just began working at an office. Supervisor A is very friendly and stops your workspace to greet you in the morning and ask about your family, weekend plans, etc. Supervisor B rarely speaks to you but often takes files off your desk and walks away with them without a word. Supervisor B’s behavior really bothers you.
    • Which of the following actions is the best way to resolve the problem?
      • Tell Supervisor A about the problem.
      • Politely approach Supervisor B about the issue.
      • Do nothing and hope that Supervisor B’s behavior will change.
      • Ask Supervisor A to speak to Supervisor B.
    • By now you should know that ignoring the problem is the worst thing that you can do. Ignoring the problem will not make it go away and may have the opposite affect of making the problem worse.
    • You should politely approach Supervisor B about the issue because she probably has no idea that her behavior is creating a conflict with you. Define the problem for Supervisor B, try to identify areas of agreement and disagreement, and restate the conflict in your own words.

 

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This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in CT. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Knowing Yourself: Are You Open to Change?

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Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.”  Andre Gide

To change is to become different; to make someone or something different; or to become something else. Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Despite the fact that many people are resistant to change in their personal and professional lives, it is useless to try to avoid change. Change is constant and cannot be held off by continuing to do what you always do.

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The benefits of change are many and expand our opportunities:

  1. Flexibility – Making changes helps us to be adaptable to new situations, new environments, and new people.
  2. Personal Growth –  When we make changes we learn new things, discover new insignts, and grow as individuals.
  3. Life Values – Looking at our personal and professional life from a different perspective can reinforce our life values.
  4. New Beginnings – Change closes the book on the old and brings about new beginnings.
  5. Opportunties – Change brings new choices and opportunities for growth and advancement.
  6. Improvements – Without change there cannot be improvements in our personal and professional lives.
  7. Progress – Changes move things forward triggering progress and development.
  8. Routine – Without change, our lives woud be static, uniform and predictable.
  9. Snowball Effect – Making small changes will amount to bigger changes.
  10. Strength – Overcoming fears and doubts about change makes us stronger.

Take time to think about the specific changes, personal and professional, you want to make in 2016 and why. Make a list below:






 

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To make changes in our lives we have to be aware of any potential blindspots that may prevent us from achieving our goals. We also need to be aware of any baggage that we may bring along to the transition.

To determine whether you are open, or resistant, to change, answer Yes or No to the following questions:

  1. Are you quick to learn new ways of doing things?       Yes _____      No _____
  2. Do you have to be certain that doing something differently is worthwhile before you will agree to try it?     Yes _____    No _____
  3. Are you eager to learn about new opportunities?      Yes _____    No _____
  4. Do you try to keep yourself up-to-date on current events?     Yes _____    No _____
  5. As soon as you hear about something new do you like to try it before anyone else?      Yes _____    No _____
  6. Do you think too much time and energy is wasted on experimenting with new ideas before everything is known about them?   Yes _____  No _____
  7. When it comes to using new methods of doing things, do you prefer to be a follower rather than a leader?   Yes _____  No _____
  8. If you like the way things are, do you resist making changes?   Yes _____  No _____
  9. If you hear about something new, do you feel restless until you try it?                             Yes _____   No _____
  10. Do you feel like making changes creates too many problems and pressures and prefer to relax and enjoy what you have?   Yes _____   No _____

Now, get to it . . .

 

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This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in CT. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Knowing Yourself: S.M.A.R.T. Goals

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“If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or things.” Albert Einstein

 

 

 

 

To have a goal means you have begun to make plans to achieve the goal. A S.M.A.R.T. goal is a goal that is in writing and is:

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  • Specific;
  • Measurable;
  • Attainable;
  • Relevant; and
  • Has a deadline (is time-based).

 

A specific goal should answer the questions What? Why? Who? Where? and Which?

  • What do you want to accomplish?
  • Why have such a goal — the specific reasons, purposes or benefits of accomplishing the goal?
  • Who is involved in helping you to accomplish your goal?
  • Where will you find the resources and assistance to achieve your goals?
  • Which requirements and constraints such as deadlines and resources will assist you to achieve your interim and final goal?

You must have concrete criteria to measure your progress in order for a goal to be S.M.A.R.T. Measuring the progress toward achievement of your goal will help you to maintain your focus and stay on track. A measurable goal will answer questions such as:

  • How much?
  • How many?
  • How you will know when you have accomplished your goal?
  • Indicators should be quantifiable.

A S.M.A.R.T. goal must be attainable and realistic. When you identify your goal you begin to paln for achievement of the goal — you develop the attitudes, abilities, skills, and financial capacity you will need to reach your goals. Don’t make a goal that is impossible to achieve based on your current resources and capabilities. If your goal is big, break it down into smaller goals or steps and go An attainable goal answers the question How?:

  • How will the goal be accomplished?
  • How realistic is the goal based on your constraints and obstacles?

A S.M.A.R.T. goal is relevant. A relevant goal answers YES to these questions:

  • Does this goal seem worthwhile?
  • Is this the right time for this goal?
  • Does this goal match your other efforts or needs?
  • Are you the right person to accomplish this goal?
  • Is this goal appkicable in the current business environment?

 

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A S.M.A.R.T. goal is grounded within a time-frame or target date for accomplishment. A commitment to a deadline will help you to focus your efforts on completion of the goal on or before a due date. A time-bound goal will answer the questions:

  • When will you accomplish your goal?
  • What can I do in six months to move forward to accomplishing my goal?
  • What can I do in six weeks?
  • What can I do today toward my goal?

 

When making plans to achieve your goal, write down the answers to the following questions and you will be on your way to achieving a S.M.A.R.T. goal:

What is my goal? What do I want?

Why do I want to do this? How will accomplishing my goal make me feel?

  • Is it time-bound?
  • Is it relevant?
  • Is it attainable?
  • Is it measurable?
  • Restate your goal and be specific

What obstacles might prevent me from achieving my goal?

Who or what can help me to achieve my goal?

What is the deadline for achieving my goal?

How will I know I have completed my goal? What are the checkpoints I’ve set to guide me to completion of my goal?

Now, get to it . . .

bitmoji155069107-3This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in CT. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.