Category Archives: Interview Process

Tips for Interviewing: Boss Fit

In general, millenials state that open communication and support are the most important qualities in a manager/supervisor. However, individuals very different and have varied experiences, expectations, and goals. When considering whether a candidate is a good fit with the manager, the hiring manager will ask questions in the hope of understanding each candidate values and how those values match with the manager’s personal style and the job expectations. Source: Randstat’s Gen Z and Millennials Collide @ Work report, U.S. findings.

Questions the hiring manager may ask are the following questions:

  1. In your previous jobs, have you ever reported to more than one person at a time? How did you prioritize your work? How did this process work for you?
  2. Tell me about some constructive feedback you received from a manager. How did you react?
  3. In your most recent position, how much direction did you get from your immediate supervisor? do you feel that this level of supervision was sufficient, excessive, or not enough?
  4. Describe the best manager you’ve ever had. What did you appreciate the most about this person?
  5. Tell me about the manager who was the most effective in motivating you. What, specifically, inspired you?
  6. Give an example of a time when your manager did something that demotivated you. What was the situation and how did you react?
  7. Describe the manager for whom you least enjoyed working. What, specifically, did you dislike about the approach?

Hiring managers typically interview candidates who will work for others, not for themselves. As a result, the hiring manager is trying to compare the candidates stories and anedotes to what he or she understands about the position, the team, and the the manager’s leadership style. It is not an easy task to determine whether the manager (someone else) can effectively motivate the employee, deliver constructive feedback in a manner that will be accepted by the candidate, or provide the level of management the candidate will need and want.

Now, get to it . . .

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Tips for Interviewing: Company Fit

Interviewing is a skill that requires cultivation and on-going maintenance because one never knows what to expect when arriving at a company for an interview. The reason for this is that interviews are often the least disciplined component of the talent acquisition process. While recruiters and human resource managers who oversee talent acquisition are trained interviewers, many hiring managers are not. Worse, many hiring managers find the task to be unpleasant and grueling. Regardless of who is conducting the interview, most interviewers have the goal of determining if the candidate is a good fit for the company, for the leadership, and the job.

To determine whether a candidate is a good fit for the company, the interviewer may ask the following questions:

  1. What do you know about the company? What aspects of working at the company are most appealing to you?
  2. Of all the companies you’ve worked for so far in your career, which one(s) did you enjoy working for and why?
  3. Where did you experience the best teamwork? What made that team successful?
  4. Provide an example of someone with whom you found it diffcult to work? Why? What did you do, if anything, to make the situation better (more workable)?
  5. Describe a time when you had difficulty accomplishing a task. What obstacles did you encounter? Who did you go to for help?
  6. Describe a time in your previous job where you were asked to do something which you didn’t agree. What did you do?
  7. Describe the different workspace arrangments you’ve experienced (open space, cubicle, private office). Which one did you prefer and why?

In general,  employees who are able to function well in teams and organizations will have had mostly positive experiences with past employers. A candidate who will fit into the work environment, work well with other members of the team, and respect company values is likely to use the word “we” more than the word “I” when describing team projects  and accomplishments and will demonstrate a measure of understanding and ownership for team objectives.

Conflict or disagreement between colleagues are bound to occur in a work setting. The ability to resolve these situations constructively is a valuable skill for employees to have and an asset to the team.

Both Gen Z and Millennials cite the people they work with as the number one attribute that enables them to do their best work. During the interview process, it is likely that candidates will be offered the opportunity to meet some of the members of the team to measure compatibility. Source: Randstad’s Gen Z and Millennials Collide @ Work report, U.S. findings.

Now, get to it . . .

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This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Organizational Tool: Data Worksheet

It is unquestionably necessary that you have your essential job search data available at all times. You do not know when you will be asked to complete a job application, respond to job leads, or provide reference information. Remember, any face-to-face meeting with a decision-maker may be considered an interview for a present or potential job opening. This high level of organization is absolutely necessary for any serious job seeker.

Keep a list of three KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS that best prove your ability to do the kind of work you want. These are S*T*A*R* STORIES that emphasize skills and accomplishments that support your ability to do the job you want.

S*T*A*R* stories are an interviewing technique for responding to behavioral job interview questions. The premise behind the behavior job interview is that the most accurate predictor of future performance is past performance. With that said:

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  • “S” stands for situation. You must describe the situation with enough detail so that the interviewer understands the specific event that was at issue.
  • “T” is the task you needed to accomplish.
  • “A” is the action that you took to accomplish the task.
  • “R” are the results that you achieved. The results do not have to be yours alone if you worked with a group to resolve the task.

List your EDUCATION AND TRAINING, beginning with high school and including all formal or informal learning, workshops, military training, college, certificate programs, etc.

  • What are the names of the schools that you attended and the years of attendance.
  • What subjects and extracurricular activities, hobbies, associations, etc. relate to your employment objectives.
  • Do not forget to list any accomplishments or things you did well and any special skills learned.

Work and Volunteer History: List your most recent job first, followed by each previous position/job. Military experience, unpaid or volunteer work, and work in a family business should be included here, too. If needed, use additional sheets to cover all significant paid or unpaid work experiences.

  • Emphasize details that will help support your job objective and your interest in the present position. Include metrics (numbers, statistics, ratios, etc.) to support what you did.
  • Emphasize results you achieved, using metrics to support them whenever possible.
  • Examples are the number of people served, the number of transactions processed, the percentage of increased sales, the number of people supervised, total budget you were responsible for, percentage of increased response time to customer inquiries, etc.
  • Make sure to repeat this information in the interview to reinforce your skills for the position.

References are those people who know your work well and will report positively as to work and character. Contact past supervisors, work peers, customers, subordinates, etc. about serving as a reference for you. Tell them about the position you want and your skills and quaifications for the job. Don’t be afraid to ask them what they will say if contacted by a potential employer.  Some employers will not provide references in a phone call so ask them for a letter of reference in advance.

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If a past employer may provide a negative reference because not all partings are amicable regardless of the circumstances, negotiate what they will say in the reference. Also, get written references from others you worked with while employed by that past employer to counteract what may be a negative reference.

 

Now, get to it . . .

Source: Quick Online Job Search, Michael Farr and The Editors @ JIST, 2011 ed.

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This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Job Search Step 3: Networking

shake handsJob search used to involve working with an employment agency, checking for “help wanted” ads in the newspaper, calling a company’s human resources staff to find out about current job openings, or walking into a local business with a “Help Wanted” sign in the window to find job leads.

Today, job leads are found through networking. Job leads are found on online networking platforms like Twitter and LinkedIn, job search sites like Indeed.com and Monster.com, and company websites.

In some instances job openings are not posted at all. So, how do job seekers find unadvertised/unposted jobs?

DON’T WAIT UNTIL THE POSITION IS OPEN OR THE JOB IS LISTED BEFORE CONTACTING THE EMPLOYER. Don’t ask whether an employer has a open position. Rather, share with a potential employer that you understand there may not be an open position at present but that you would like to talk to you about the possibility of future openings.

Why have this conversation when a position is not immediately available? More and more, job openings are filled by people the employer already knows or who find out about job openings through networking or being in the right place at the right time. In other words, your next employer finds out about you from a friend, neighbor, relative, contact at a professional organization, LinkedIn, etc. and considers bringing you in to discuss an current opening or soon-to-be open position.

Develop a network of contacts.

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  • Make a list of all the people you know personally, professionally, or from school.
  • Include family members, classmates, neighbors, your kids’ teachers, co-workers, professional or social organizations, people you speak to at the dog park, who go to the same salon, etc.
  • Look on-line for contact information to find out how to communicate with the people on your list. Some ways to do this are to:
    • Join LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com) and set up a profile.
    • Start a Facebook account (www.facebook.com) for professional contacts and networking. Include job titles, former employers, the names of schools you attended, and organizational affiliations.
      • If you have a personal Facebook account, consider using the privacy settings to close your account to anyone outside your personal circle.
      • Do not post anything that might mae you look bad. Stay positive, avoid controversial topics such as politics.
    • Network with employers on Twitter. Twitter is a social networking site that allows people to share information through 140-character messages called tweets.
  • Each week set a goal for networking contacts. Let your contacts know that you are looking for a job and need their help. Be clear as to the type of work you want and the skills and qualifications you bring to an organization. Have your networking or elevator speech ready whether you are emailing, calling, or run into a contact at the coffee shop. REFER TO 12/15/15 POST ENTITLED “WHO ARE YOU? HOW TO CRAFT AN ELEVATOR SPEECH”
  • Ask your contacts for leads to expand your network. Ask your contacts:
    • Do you know of any openings for a person with my skills and experience?
    • Do you know of anyone else who might know of such an opening?
    • Do you know of anyone who might know of anyone else who might be able to help me idenitfy a job opening?
  • Then contact anyone identified by your contacts and ask them the same questions. Try to get at least one name from these people and then e-mail or call them and invite them to connect with you on LinkedIn.

There are many different job search methods and any one of these methods could work for you. Of course, some methods are more effective than others. I hope that this posting will help you to spend more of your time using uber-effective methods so that you find your next employment opportunity in record time.

Now, get to it . . .

Source: Quick Online Job Search, Michael Farr and The Editors @ JIST, 2011 ed.key

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

How Power Posing Can Improve Your Career

BODY LANGUAGE: How A Short ‘Power Pose’ Can Change Your Life and Career, Article by Henry Blodget posted November 19, 2012 (viewed Septermber 18, 2016 on Business Insider).

“Harvard Business School professor Amy Cuddy gave a TED Talk this summer about how tiny changes in your body language can radically change your job performance and career.

“Certain “power poses” immediately change your body chemistry, Professor Cuddy says.

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Lower power pose                VS.                           High power pose

“And these changes help or hurt the way other people perceive you and, importantly, affect the way you actually perform.

“Professor Cuddy concluded her talk with a startling revelation about herself, one that led her to choke up momentarily. Then the talk ended in a standing ovation.”

 

Mr. Blodget then listed Professor’s Cuddy’s key talking points. Below, I’ve listed a few of these talking points:

  1. Body language is the non-verbal communication that can tell us almost everything about what is going on in a given situation such as a interview.
  2. Small gestures, such as a handshake or smile, reveal glimpses of character and shape perceptions about how people are percieved.
  3. One of the most important elements of body language is what is called the “power pose.”
    • In this pose, the person is “opened up” and taking up space. Such as holding your arms over your held in a large “V.”
    • This is the most common high-power poses.
  4. In low power situations, when people feel feeble or helpless, they close up and become small.
    • In this pose, the person hunches over, crosses their arms, and wraps him or herself up.
    • This person takes up little space and closes off from other people.
  5. The “high power” and “low power” poses tend to compliment one another so that it appears  that one person is in charge and the other is not.
    • Professor Cuddy detemined that our nonverbal communication affects how other people think and feel about us.
  6. Professor Cuddy also determined that our nonverbal communications govern how we think and feel about ourselves. In other words, our bodies can change our minds.
    • After a two-minute “high power pose,” the risk tolerance of the high-power posers soared. The risk tolerance of the low-power poses shrank.
    • After a two-minute pose, the testosterone (dominance hormone) levels of the high-power posers rose 20%.After a two-minute pose, the testosterone of the low-power posers fell 10%.
      • After a two-minute “high power pose,” cortisol levels dropped sharply and people were better able to handle stressful situations.  The cortisol levels of the “low-power” people rose.
  7. So, can power posing for a few minutes really change our lives in meaningful ways?
  8. Professor Cuddy found that tbody language is everything. According to Professor Cuddy:
    • Our bodies change our minds
    • and our minds change our behavior
    • and our behavior changes our outcomes.
  9. Professor Cuddy’s message is this . . . FAKE IT ‘TIL YOU BECOME IT.
    • Small changes in body language can change our body chemistry : tiny tweaks result in BIG CHANGES
    • Eventually you will no longer fake strength and confidence because  you will have strength and confidence. You may have started out faking it but eventually you will have it.

CONCLUSION:  Try a power pose before your next interview and see how it makes you feel. Try a power pose every day until your physical presence emotes passion, enthusiasm, confidence, authenticity, and comfort.

BODY LANGUAGE: How A Short ‘Power Pose’ Can Change Your Life and Career, Article by Henry Blodget posted November 19, 2012 (viewed Septermber 18, 2016 on Business Insider).

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This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences and interests with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Clues to Uncover Corporate Culture, Article by Barbara Safani

“I often remind my clients that when they are interviewing for an open position, they are interviewing the employer as much as the employer is interviewing them. By paying attention to the subtle clues in the office environment, job seekers can gain a better perspective on the culture of the company or division and make more informed decisions about how they’ll fit. Here are a few tips to help you size up the work environment of the company you are interviewing with.

1. If possible, schedule your interview early in the morning, late in the day or during lunchtime.

When you arrive, look around and see who else is there at that time. If you have an early morning or early evening appointment and the office is packed, chances are that the culture is one that expects long hours. If you interview during lunch and everyone seems to be eating at their desks, that could be a clue about the culture of the organization. If you are interviewing with a company that has a company parking lot, observe how full the lot is during these hours to determine if late nights or early mornings are part of the culture of the entire organization.

2. Ask to do a walk-through of the office.

If you have made it to the second round of interviews, consider asking to see the office space. This allows you to canvass the physical space, but again gives you important clues about the office culture. Is the setup cubicle-style, big open spaces, windowed offices or a lot of closed doors? Does the space appear clean and well maintained, and feel like a place where you would feel comfortable and safe?

3. Make small talk with the receptionist.

This is important for several reasons. Many hiring authorities ask the receptionist his impressions of candidates who come in to apply for jobs. Make sure his first impression of you is positive. Through your conversation, you may gain valuable tidbits of information or see firsthand what types of people come through the reception area and how they interact with each other.

4. Note any interruptions during the interview.

Again, this could be a sign of what it’s like to work in that particular environment. Did your interview start on time or were you kept waiting? Is the interview conducted in a quiet environment behind closed doors? Does the person interviewing you interrupt the flow of the meeting to take phone calls? Does the interview end abruptly due to some sort of office crisis? While there are some hiring authorities who ‘stage’ interruptions to see how you deal with them, I truly believe that for the most part these are not planned. Instead, this can be indicative of the department’s culture or the hiring manager’s style.

5. Observe preferred communication styles.

How were the interview and follow-up meetings arranged? Were they set up by e-mail, phone or snail mail? Does the company prefer one-on-one or group interview formats? Did the hiring manager give you any technical tests or assessments as part of the interview process? By observing the different ways companies interview and gather information, job seekers can begin to uncover how information is managed and validated by members of the organization.

Of course, no interview scenario is perfect, and I’m not suggesting that you penalize a company or hiring authority if a glitch occurs during the interview. But it is important to observe the rhythm of the office and factor that information into your decision. What have you observed during your interviews, and how has that information influenced your feelings about a company or a job?”

This article was written by Barbara Safani, owner of CAreer Solvers. Ms. Safani has has over 12 years of experience in career management, recruiting, executive coaching and organizational development. She is a triple-certified resume writer and author of “Happy About My Resume: 50 Tips for Building a Better Document to Secure a Brighter Future.”

ARTICLE VIEWED ON MARCH 11, 2016 ON THELADDERS.COM

bitmoji1895589661This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Marc Cenedella’s (Theladders.com) Best Interview Tip

According to Marc Cenedella of TheLadders.com: “In the decade I’ve been writing this newsletter, the single best tip I’ve given, that has come back to me over, and over, and over again, is this:

“When it gets to that part of the interview with your future boss where they ask, ‘well, do you have any questions for me?’, say yes, and ask . . .

“‘How do I help you get a gold star on your review next year?’

“This bit of advice has helped more people in more interviews than any other bit of advice I’ve shared in the last decade that I’ve been writing to you.

“Why?

“Well, the interview process lends itself to self-absorption. We spend so much of the time talking about ourselves that we can sound like one of those people who talks only about themselves.

“Or, conversely, we become ‘job analysis engineers’ and ask all sorts of questions about the job and reporting structure and how it fits in with the company’s five-year plan and so on. I love getting questions from candidates in interviews, but I do have to admit that I feel they’re not quite getting the point of a ‘face-to-face’ interview when they pull out six pages of typed, single-spaced questions and promptly bury their nose in their papers without making eye contact.

“We get so obsessed with the detail of the job that we forget about the work.

“Working together and being a good addition to the team means being concerned with how you are making the team successful. And that means being concerned with how well you are helping your boss to succeed.

“Asking this question shows that you have empathy. It shows that you have an interest in your boss’ career and future success. It shows that you are not just a self-absorbed ‘what’s-in-it-for-me’ kind of person. And it shows that you know you are there to ‘give’ as much as you are there to ‘get’.

“Dozens of subscribers have told me how the interviewer’s face lights up when asked this question. I have heard time and time and time again from our six million subscribers how effective it’s been in interviews.

“(And, remember, you want the vibe to be cool & relaxed Vince Vaughn, not an obsequious Steve Buscemi.)”

Source: Marc Cenedella, TheLadders.com newsletter, viewed February 15, 2016.

Now, get to it . . .

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This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

25 Oddball Interview Questions

It’s been awhile since I offered any suggestions for answering interview questions. This is always an interesting topic because there are so many possible interview questions and so many excellent answers to those questions. Today I’d like to share with you some strange and unique interview questions I found on Forbes.com.

After reading the list below you may think there is no way that you can prepare in advance to answer these questions. You would be wrong.

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Your goal in responding to an oddball interview question should not be to get to the “right” answer. Your goal should be to show, by example, how you handle challenges and approach the process of solving problems.  The interviewer will assess whether, when faced with a difficult situation, you are likely to freeze like the proverbial “deer in the headlights” or if you are quick “on your feet,” composed, and confident.

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If asked an “oddball” question at an interview, do not rush into your answer. Take a moment to breathe and gather your thoughts. Perhaps you will ask a pointed question for added details or descriptions. Then respond with a thoughtful and reasoned answer.

 

 

fotolia_26700943The Forbes.com 25 Oddball Interview Questions are:

  • If you were to get rid of one state in the United States, which would it be and why?
    • Asked at Forrester Research
  • How many cows are there in Canada?
    • Asked at Google
  • How many quarters would you need to reach the height of the Empire State Building?
    • Asked at JetBlue
  • A penguin walks through the door right now wearing a sombrero. What does he say and why is he here?
    • Asked at Clark Construction Group
  • What songs best describes your work ethic?
    • Asked at Dell
  • Jeff Bezos walks into your office and says you can have a million dollars to launch your best entrepreneurial idea. What is it?
    • Asked at Amazon
  • What do you think about when you are alone in your car?
    • Asked at Gallup
  • How would you rate your memory?
    • Asked at Marriot
  • Name three previous Nobel Prize Winners.
    • Asked at BenefitsCONNECT
  • Can you say: “Peter Pepper Picked a Pickled Pepper” and cross-sell a washing machine at the same time?
    • Asked at MasterCard
  • If we came to your house for supper, what would you prepare for us?
    • Asked at Trader Joe’s
  • How would people communicate in a perfect world?
    • Asked at Novell
  • How do you make a tuna sandwich?
    • Asked at Astron Consulting
  • My spouse and I are going on vacation, where would you recommend that we go?
    • Asked at PricewaterhouseCoopers
  • You are a head chef at a restaurant and your team has been selected to be on Iron Chef. How do you prepare your team for the competition and how do you leverage the competition for your restaurant?
    • Asked at Accenture
  • Estimate how many windows are in New York City?
    • Asked at Bain & Company
  • What’s  your favorite song? Perform it for us now.
    • Asked at LivingSocial
  • Calculate the angle of two clock hands (pointers) when time is 11:50.
    • Asked at Bank of America
  • Have you ever stolen a pen from work?
    • Asked at Jiffy Software
  • Pick two celebrities to be your parents.
    • Asked at Urban Outfitters
  • If you were kitchen utensils, which kitchen utensils would you be?
    • Asked at Bandwidth.com
  • On a scale form one to ten, rate me as an interviewer.
    • Asked at Kraft Foods
  • If you had turned your cell phone to silent, and it rang really loudly despite it being on silent, what would you tell me?
    • Asked at Kimberly-Clark
  • If you could be anyone else, who would it be?
    • Asked at Salesforce.com
  • How would you direct someone else on how to cook an omelet?
    • Asked at PETCO

Source: 25 Oddball Interview Questions – In Photos, Forbes.com. Viewed on 2/4/2016.

Do you think you would be called back for a second interview if asked an oddball question in the first interview?  The way to your next job is just like the path to Carnegie Hall . . . Practice, Practice, Practice.

Now, get to it . . .

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This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Sample Interview Questions and Answer Strategies, Part 3

Why are you thinking of leaving your current position?

Your answer should be positive. Avoid any negative comments about your position, industry, company, boss, coworkers, or customers.

Let the interviewer know what you are looking for in a new position and how the open position meets your interests. Does the open position offer more money, responsibility or the potential for advancement or growth? If you are not 100% certain that you want to leave as your present position for the open position, let the interviewer know this too.

If you are presently unemployed, be prepared to give a brief reason for leaving your prior position. Let the interviewer know if you left your position voluntarily or if you were let go. If you were let go, was it the result of a company-wide or department layoff, merger or takeover?

If you were fired, give as fair and unbiased a response as you can; answering from both your point of view and the point of view of your former employer. This means describing the situation candidly, succinctly and without any bitterness. Be prepared to answer follow up questions such as “What did you learn from this experience?” or “What would you have done differently?”

What could you have done better in your last job?

Again, it is best to avoid being negative. Likewise, do not confess to any problems, major or minor. A better answer is to say “With the benefit of hindsight you can always find things to do better, but off the top of my head I cannot think of anything of major consequence.”

If the interviewer pressures you for more information, describe a situation that failed as a result of external conditions beyond your control.

Why have you been out of work so long?

You’re answer should be the same regardless of whether you are doing a telephone screen or an in-person interview with a recruiter or hiring manager. Here are some possible responses:

  • I decided to start a business (like a consulting business)
  • I am the officer of XYZ organization
  • I took some college courses to stay current in my career (or on-line classes)
  • I am currently teaching XYZ subject (ensure that it has business relevance)
  • I volunteer at a local soup kitchen, my child’s school or an organization in my current industry or business
  • I started a networking organization to help those out of work
  • I decided to coach a season of my child’s baseball league

Source: www.info.theladders.com.

It is suggested that you emphasize factors that have prolonged your job search by your own choice. You do not want to seem like damaged goods.

Why should I hire you?

If you have done your homework and prepared for the interview you should be able to answer this question easily. Help the interviewer to see you in the position. Walk him or her through each of the position’s requirements as you understand them, and follow each with a reason why you meet that requirement. Specifically, if you understand the employer’s needs and company culture, you will be able to match each position requirement with your personal qualifications.

Why aren’t you making more money at this stage in your career?

Your answer should not sound defensive or give the impression that money is not important to you. You will need to explain why your present salary or salary history might be below industry standards.

Your best answer is that money is important to you but other factors are even more important. For example, “Making money is important to me. That is one of the things that interests me in this position because I am looking to make more money at this point in my career. But even more important to me is doing work I really enjoy and am proud to do at the kind of company I like and respect.”

Be prepared for follow up questions about your ideal position and company. Be sure to match your answers as closely as possible to the requirements of the open position and the culture of the company/department.

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Now, get to it . . .

 

 

 

 

 

 

This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut, with extensive human resources experience. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. I am not an expert in any of the areas of job search. I am writing to share my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

The Top Most Valuable Career Skills of 2015

240_F_59188705_IQBjR2l30W9ij3u50dNzcJTQ4UNqtqM2 (1)According to Coursera* (www.coursera.org), the 10 most valuable careers and the associated skills of 2015 were:

  1. Digital Marketing — strategic planning and analytics for digital marketing channels
  2. Data Science — GitHub, RStudio and data visualization techniques
  3. Interaction Design — Prototyping, user testing, and visual design
  4. Business Strategy — strategy formulation, execution, and assessment
  5. Strategic Business Analytics — marketing, supply chain, and human resource analytics
  6. Data Science at Scale — SQL, NoSQL, data mining, and machine learning
  7. Genomic Data Science — Python, R, Bioconductor, and Galaxy
  8. Organizational Leadership — motivation, self-assessment, and conflict management
  9. Social Media Marketing — campaign management, brand positioning, and content development
  10. Strategic Management and Innovation — goal setting, value creation, and diversification

240_F_68248134_XEOcSk5SehSx8Z9JUklyzYxJ3WRVOYKlLooking forward to the new year, job seekers will need a mix of technical and traditional “soft skills” to be competitive in the job market. The tech industry will continue to accelerate and tech skills will remain in high demand. The emphasis in the job market will be on technical job skills necessary for the accomplishment of mathematical, engineering, scientific, and computer-related tasks.

Also in demand in 2016 will be traditional people skills, often referred to as soft skills. To be successful in job search in 2016, job seekers will need leadership, entrepreneurial and interpersonal skills such as a strong business strategy, communication, time management, and teamwork / collaboration skills. It is not enough to say that you possess a cache of these skills, whether on your resume or in the interview, you must be prepared to quantify and describe your experience and success in each of these areas.

Now, get to it . . .

* Coursera (www.coursera.org) is an education platform that partners with top universities and organizations worldwide to offer online courses and programs that anyone can take.

 

This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut, with extensive human resources experience. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. I am not an expert in any of the areas of job search. I am writing to share my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.