Tag Archives: business presence

Tips for Interviewing: Boss Fit

In general, millenials state that open communication and support are the most important qualities in a manager/supervisor. However, individuals very different and have varied experiences, expectations, and goals. When considering whether a candidate is a good fit with the manager, the hiring manager will ask questions in the hope of understanding each candidate values and how those values match with the manager’s personal style and the job expectations. Source: Randstat’s Gen Z and Millennials Collide @ Work report, U.S. findings.

Questions the hiring manager may ask are the following questions:

  1. In your previous jobs, have you ever reported to more than one person at a time? How did you prioritize your work? How did this process work for you?
  2. Tell me about some constructive feedback you received from a manager. How did you react?
  3. In your most recent position, how much direction did you get from your immediate supervisor? do you feel that this level of supervision was sufficient, excessive, or not enough?
  4. Describe the best manager you’ve ever had. What did you appreciate the most about this person?
  5. Tell me about the manager who was the most effective in motivating you. What, specifically, inspired you?
  6. Give an example of a time when your manager did something that demotivated you. What was the situation and how did you react?
  7. Describe the manager for whom you least enjoyed working. What, specifically, did you dislike about the approach?

Hiring managers typically interview candidates who will work for others, not for themselves. As a result, the hiring manager is trying to compare the candidates stories and anedotes to what he or she understands about the position, the team, and the the manager’s leadership style. It is not an easy task to determine whether the manager (someone else) can effectively motivate the employee, deliver constructive feedback in a manner that will be accepted by the candidate, or provide the level of management the candidate will need and want.

Now, get to it . . .

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Tips for Interviewing: Company Fit

Interviewing is a skill that requires cultivation and on-going maintenance because one never knows what to expect when arriving at a company for an interview. The reason for this is that interviews are often the least disciplined component of the talent acquisition process. While recruiters and human resource managers who oversee talent acquisition are trained interviewers, many hiring managers are not. Worse, many hiring managers find the task to be unpleasant and grueling. Regardless of who is conducting the interview, most interviewers have the goal of determining if the candidate is a good fit for the company, for the leadership, and the job.

To determine whether a candidate is a good fit for the company, the interviewer may ask the following questions:

  1. What do you know about the company? What aspects of working at the company are most appealing to you?
  2. Of all the companies you’ve worked for so far in your career, which one(s) did you enjoy working for and why?
  3. Where did you experience the best teamwork? What made that team successful?
  4. Provide an example of someone with whom you found it diffcult to work? Why? What did you do, if anything, to make the situation better (more workable)?
  5. Describe a time when you had difficulty accomplishing a task. What obstacles did you encounter? Who did you go to for help?
  6. Describe a time in your previous job where you were asked to do something which you didn’t agree. What did you do?
  7. Describe the different workspace arrangments you’ve experienced (open space, cubicle, private office). Which one did you prefer and why?

In general,  employees who are able to function well in teams and organizations will have had mostly positive experiences with past employers. A candidate who will fit into the work environment, work well with other members of the team, and respect company values is likely to use the word “we” more than the word “I” when describing team projects  and accomplishments and will demonstrate a measure of understanding and ownership for team objectives.

Conflict or disagreement between colleagues are bound to occur in a work setting. The ability to resolve these situations constructively is a valuable skill for employees to have and an asset to the team.

Both Gen Z and Millennials cite the people they work with as the number one attribute that enables them to do their best work. During the interview process, it is likely that candidates will be offered the opportunity to meet some of the members of the team to measure compatibility. Source: Randstad’s Gen Z and Millennials Collide @ Work report, U.S. findings.

Now, get to it . . .

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This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Building Your Brand

Establishing your personal brand is about identifying your characteristics, assets, strengths, and skills as an individual. Branding is a mix of how you present yourself and how others see you. It is important to be aware of how you are viewed by the personal and professional contacts in your network.

There are three key steps to building your personal brand.

  • Building self-awareness:
    1. Reflect on your past work experiences, analyze career high points and low, and idenify the common themes, habits, and trends.
    2. Focus on what was going on in your professional life at the time, the type of work you were doing, what the environment was like, and who you were working with at the time.
  • Communicate your value:
    1. Practice describing your strengths and how you use them in your professional life and communicate the value you bring to the organization, work, and co-workers, and clients.
    2. Ask yourself, what are you known for, what are you good at, what energizes and motivates you, how do you like to work (independently or as part of a team, at home or in the office, etc), and what do you want to avoid?

  • Build your reputation:
    1. Find ways to connect with the individuals and communities that fit your strengths and career aspirations. Ask your network to make introductions on your behalf whenever possible to extend your opportunities and network.
    2. Think practically about who can held you further your career aspirations, how you can network with these folks more effectively, and how to gain visibility with decision makers.

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Why Table Manners Still Matter: A Book Review

240_f_61521310_jyqub3jpkclu7vd4aqcyj9kdb6hd0knzTable manners are often viewed as an out-of-date, classist set of rules that have no place in the 21st century. But in his new book, Table Manners: How to Behave in the Modern World and Why Bother, chef Jeremiah Tower argues that knowing how to comport yourself over a meal can still help you get ahead.

 

240_f_108751778_v0hf6m6swbupcvctjmnuo3lumpipmvcyIn some cultures, for example, it’s considered improper to gesture while you eat. Although the rule itself might seem arbitrary, obeying it signals to your dining companion that you respect his culture, an invaluable skill in business dealings. Similarly, knowing how to properly set read and white wineglasses (both on the right side, with the red wineglass closer to the center of the table) could be an easy way to impress a boss who’s a wine buff.

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“I have found that when people approve of your table manners they think you know how to do everything else properly as well,” Tower writes. “That is how you enlist them to your side.”

 

Book review by Sarah Begley, viewed in Time Magazine, October 30, 2016

Now, get to it . . .

key

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Viewpoint: How Thinking Like a Kid Can Spur Creativity

How thinking like a kid can spur creativity

By Peter Himmelman

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It’s common for adults to feel like we’re drowning in judgment — “You’re not famous enough,” You’re not smart enough,” “You’re not thin enough.” The weight of these appraisals, from others and from ourselves, can prevent us from looking at the world as a child might, as a place of wonder and new possibilities. This, in turn, keeps us from accessing the state of mind that stands at the root of creativity: playfulness.

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When a child is engaged in play, she is taking material from her inner reality, or dreamworld, and placing it into what we might call the real world. Very young children don’t think about the consequences or how they might be perceived; they just play. Studies have shown that when we fully immerse ourselves in joyous doing — as opposed to anxious mulling – we can become more creative.

How can we, as adults, adopt this mindset? Before undertaking a daunting task, spend a few minutes writing a detailed description of what your idea could be in its most beneficial form; that way, you’re primed to think positively, as kids do. Then set a timer and being one small piece of the task, which forces you to act rather than ruminate. To be sure, you may have to assess the kinds of risks that children do not. But more often than not, we tend to stress over imagined threats, not real ones. The more we’re aware of that trap, the easier it is to avoid.

 

Viewed in Time Magazine, October 30, 2016

Peter Himmelman is the founder of Big Muse and the author of Let Me Out: Unlock Your Creative Mind and Bring Your Ideas to Life

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This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Job Search Step 5: Manage Your Job Search

Any face-to-face contact with a person with the authority to hire or supervise an employee, even if there is no job opening at the time of the meeting, is an interview. Many of the articles I’ve seen on the internet claim that something like 40% of job seekers report finding jobs in this way.

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Regardless of the accuracy of this statistic, you should consider changing your definition of an interview. The reason is simple: If you can interview with potential employers before a job opens up or is advertised you are more like to be considered for the positions when they do become available.

 

Finding a Job is a Job. Whether you are currently employed, unemployed, or underemployed, job search is tough and requires an extensive time commitment. To be effective, you will need a solid, thoughtful plan.

  1. Make time in your schedule to spend at least 20 hours a week looking for your next position. This means committing 20 hours of your week to targeted job search activities.
  2. Prepare a daily schedule so that you stay on task and productive each day. Don’t just  make a to-do list. List specific activities on the hour or 1/2 hour. Post your schedule in a highly visible place or on your smartphone, tablet, or computer.
    • Use Microsoft Outlook or Google Calendar at www.google.com/calendar to keep track of your activities.
    • Use your smartphone to set up automatic reminders and organize daily activities.
  3. Manage your contacts and activities electronically. Track the time spent on activities and the contacts that you make. Use free websites such as JibberJobber.com to help you manage and organize your contacts and tasks. Keep track of who you met, where, what was discussed, and when you plan to reconnect.

Are you business ready? Have you prepared your job search presence?

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Resume: Begin by making a list of your job experience, job titles, dates of employment and salary history. You won’t use all of this information for your resume but may need it when completing a job application, preparing for an interview or drafting a cover letter.

There are a lot of resources available to help:

  • Resume writing books are available at your library. Also check your local library for job/career resources and support.
  • Free resume coaching is available at the state Department of Labor, Good Will Industries, and many other local organizations and agencies.
  • Online resources such a O*NET Online (www.onetonline.org) provide useful information for job/career exploration and analysis.

Email account: Create an email account to use exclusively for your job search. The user name must be professional. An appropriate user name looks something like john.doe@gmail.com or john doe.us@live.com.

Contact telephone number: You must have a reliable contact telephone number with voice mail. The outgoing message should be professional and straightforward. This means no background noise like music or children/dogs or quotes from spiritual sources. The outgoing message should identify you as the receiver and state that you are unavailable but will get back to the caller as soon as possible.

Professional attire: Have business attire available for networking events, job fairs, interviews, etc. Articles describing appropriate dress can be found by typing “help dressing for work” in your web browser. For example, www.wikihow.com/Dress-for-Work has an article describing appropriate formal and casual business attire for men and women.

Business cards: Create and carry business cards with you at all times because you never know who you will meet or where.

  • Business cards should be simple and inexpensive. Take a look at the offerings at Staples, vistaprint.com, and avery.com.
  • Do not buy too many at first because you are likely to make changes during the job search process.

Networking speech: Prepare a short “elevator speech.” This is a 30 second to one minute statement describing your skills and qualifications, the position you want, and the people you want to meet. An example of a networking speech follows. However, you must craft a statement that fits your unique experience and skills.

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I am a ____ professional with experience in ____ and ____. Most recently, I worked at ____. My unique strengths/abilities are in the areas of ____ and ____. I am looking to talk with people that work for companies such as (list 3 to 7 target companies). Are you available to meet with me over coffee to all about ____?

Enroll in job placement websites like www.Indeed.com and www.LindedIn.com.

Register with your target companies to received job postings. Follow your target companies on LinkedIn and Twitter/Instagram.

Follow websites like dailyworth.com, IvyExec.com, and theladders.com to keep current with job search trends and available resources.

Now, get to it . . .

Source: Quick Online Job Search, Michael Farr and The Editors @ JIST, 2011 ed.

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This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Power Posing and the Impact on Presence

“‘Power Posing’ Before A Interview Makes You Much More Hireable” by  Max Nisen posted November 23, 2012 (viewed September 18, 2016).

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Harvard Professor Amy Cuddy has found that taking up a short “power pose,” an open and expansive stance, can acutally change body chemistry and make people more confident.

Her new research with Caroline Wilmuth and Dana Carney tests power posing in a real, high-impact social situation: a job interview.

Often, realizing that someone else has power over them, people hunch over their phones before an interview, which makes them feel even more powerless.

In the experiment, subjects that prepared in a different way, by adopting a power pose before a mock interview, got significantly higher scores from evaluators for hireability and performance.

Here’s how the authors sum up their results:

“This experiment demonstrates that preparatory power posing affects individuals’ presence during a job interview, which in turn influences judges’ evaluations and hiring decisions. Compared to low-power posers, high-power posers appeared to better maintain their composure, to project more confidence, and to present more captiving and enthusiastic speeches, which led to higher overall performance evaluations.”

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Many interactions in the workplace have what Cuddy calls “power asymmetry.” One person controls the future of another, which creates an imbalance. “Power posing” is one way that people can change feelings of powerlessness, and get some of the performance advantages that come with being on top.

“‘Power Posing’ Before A Interview Makes You Much More Hireable” by Max Nisen posted November 23, 2012 (viewed September 18, 2016).

keyThis Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences an interests with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Job Search Is All About First Impressions

On your next interview, networking event, or other event in which you will be meeting with people remember that job search is all about impressions. Your

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Viewed on linked on Monday, March 28, 2016.

Original post: https//www/linkedin.com/hp/update/6117433865121325056
bitmoji1895589661This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Workplace Interpersonal Skills

fotolia_88316842Well-developed interpersonal skills are extremely useful in the workplace. Managers, co-workers, clients/customers, and vendors often perceive people with good social skills as more skilled and capable than those with poor social skills. This preception may be the reason some people succeed in their professional career while others with similar strengths and personal skills do fare as well.

No one can do everything on their own. We often to cooperate with others to achieve our goals and succeed in the workplace. To work cooperatively in the workplace, co-workers need to be kind to one another and demonstrate respect for each other, their clients/customers, and vendors/suppliers.

But working with others can present difficult challenges. To overcome these challenges and get along with people in the workplace you will need to interact with others in ways that are friendly, courteous, and tactful and that demonstrate respect for others’ ideas, opinions, and contributions.fotolia_75670432

  1. Be friendly and have a positive attitude. Exchange friendly, pleasant greetings. Say “good morning” as you walk into work each day, wish people a “good evening” as you leave the office at the end of the day, or ask your co-worker about their weekend on Monday morning. You do not have to be friends with your co-workers, just friendly. These pleasantries will open a dialogue and create a friendlier, comfortable work environment.
  2. Be courteous. Mind your manners. Be considerate of the people you work with. Clean up after yourself and keep your voice low if other people are working or trying to concentrate. Don’t forget to say “please” and “thank you.”fotolia_92579538
  3. Be tactful and polite. Think before your speak and communicate clearly. Respect the other person’s point of view. Watch your language. Avoid slang, offensive language and racy jokes. Also, speak clearly and use proper grammar — even in your emails.
  4. Respond appropriately to questions, compliments, and feedback. Answer questions to the best of your ability. If you don’t know the answer, don’t be afraid to admit it and offer to find the answer. Likewise, accept compliments by saying “thank you.” If you are offered feedback, accept it graciously and use information that will be useful in performing you job.

If a co-worker behaves in a way that is offensive to you, respond in a calm and professional manner. If the problem persists, consult with your supervisor or manager, or speak to a representative in your company’s Human Resources Department.

Keep in mind that these interpersonal social skills are quite easily transferrable to your private life.

Now, get to it . . .

bitmoji1895589661This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Knowing Yourself: Impressions

We’ve all heard the warning that you only get one chance to make a first impression. Many people form opinions of other people in the first few moments of a first meeting and those impressions can last forever. Understanding how the impressions we make affect other people can greatly improve our success as job seekers and employees.

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“In our society, we put a great amount of energy into helping people form good first impressions, from crafting perfect elevator pitches to touting the importance of a firm handshake. You can be made to feel that if you blow a first impression, you’ll never regain footing.” Kristi Hedges, Contributor, Forbes Woman, September 5, 2014.

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Most of us are uncomfortable bragging about ourselves. Even more difficult is writing about ourselves. In this exercise I ask you to write down 10 things that would help someone you do not know to get to know the real you. What would this person need to know about your feelings, your personality, what you like to do, what sports you like, your pet peeves, you favorite foods, etc.?

Be sure to include your feelings as well as your outward actions and experiences. For example, ” I am thoughtful and sensitive”; “I hate know-it-alls and bossy people”; “I love the hiking and camping”; and “Growing up I dreamed of being an Olympic Athlete.” You get the idea.

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Now, get to it . . .

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This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in CT. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.