Tag Archives: professional growth

Building Your Network

Develop your network of contacts by:

  • Making a list of all the people you know personally, professionally, or from school.
    • Include family members, classmates, neighbors, your kids’ teachers, co-workers, professional or social organizations, people you speak to at the dog park, who go to the same salon, etc.
    • Research contact information on-line to find out how to communicate with the people on your list. Some ways to do this are to:
      • Join LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com) and set up a profile. Don’t just phone it in, really spend some time building an awesome profile.
      • Start a Facebook account (www.facebook.com) for professional contacts and networking. Include job titles, former employers, the names of schools you attended, and organizational affiliations.
        • If you have a personal Facebook account, consider using the available privacy settings to close your account to anyone outside your personal circle.
        • Do not post anything that might make you look bad. Stay positive, avoid controversial topics such as politics, religion, and money.
      • Network with potential contacts, business owners, and others Twitter. Twitter is a social networking site that allows people to share information through 140-character messages called tweets.
    • In addition to providing the means to research your contacts, these activities will increase your web presence and provide benefits such as 24 hour, 7 day a week accessibility and an easy and inexpensive way to market your brand.
  • Setting a weekly goal for networking contacts. Let your contacts know that you are looking for a job and need their help. Be clear as to the type of work you want and the skills and qualifications you bring to an organization. Have your networking or elevator speech ready whether you are emailing, calling, or run into a contact at the coffee shop.
  • Asking your contacts for leads to expand your network. For example:
    • Do you know of anyone with skills and interests similar to mine?
    • Do you have contact with anyone in a similar business or litigation area as me?
    • Do you know of anyone interested in working with or hiring a person with my skills and experience?
  • Contacting anyone identified by your contacts and ask them the same questions and more, like:
    • What separates you from the competition?
    • What significant changes have you seen take place in your professional area of expertise through the years?
    • What was the strangest or funniest incident you experienced in your practice or business?
  • Trying to get at least one name from each of your contacts and then emailing or calling the new contacts. Remember to invite each contact to connect with you on LinkedIn.

There is no end to the number of different networking building strategies available to you and any one of these strategies could serve you well. If one strategy is not working, don’t be afraid to try something else. You will find that some methods are more effective than others.

I hope that this posting will help you to spend more of your time using super effective networking methods. To get started, be brave and take the first step today.

This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

How to Keep Your Job Search on Track

240_f_92830750_5okumemuydpc5at4cx2yp8qhz5zweynaSearching for your next job or career opportunity is a challenging objective. It is essential that you stay positive even if all you feel is rejection and defeat. If you become frustrated in your job search you can end up sabotaging your efforts and wasting your time and resources.

How can you stay positive and motivated during a job search? Below are five ideas for staying on track during a frustrating job search:

Find things that excite you. Think about the things that you like to do and that make you happy. Schedule time each week, at least one day per week, to pursue your hobbies and interests. When you are engaged in these activites your mind will be occupied with happy, productive thoughts. And this feeling will last. When you return to your job search you will be energized, strong, and have a positive state of mind.

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Surround yourself with people who inspire you. Surrounding yourself with people who bring you up will keep you from feeling down. Stay close to the positive influencers in your life — your family, friends, significant others, and mentors. These people will help you to stay on track with your job search and your goals.

Follow people you don’t know but who inspire you. Whether they are authors, inspirational speakers, celebrities, successful business people, or bloggers, keep these “close by” so that you connect whenever you need a lift. Read their books or inspirational quotes, follow them on Facebook or Twitter, study their careers, and learn from their mistakes. A little inspiration can go a long way to lifing your spirits and improving your mood.

Help yourself by helping others. Helping other people is good for us. It makes us feel good. If you are feeling down, volunteering and helping other people will recharge your spirit and improve your mood.

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Exercise. Make time to exercise each day. Exercise will expel negative energy and release tension. Go for a run, take a walk with your dog, take a yoga, spin, or Zumba class, or lift weights. The point is to get moving. Exercise releases endorphins and endorphins make us feel happiness and pleasure.

Create structure. Each weekend, write down a plan for the upcoming week. Having a plan will give you structure and a sense of stability, control, and empowerment. Sticking with your plan will help you to feel accomplished and successful.

Now, get to it . . .

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This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects presented but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Viewpoint: How Thinking Like a Kid Can Spur Creativity

How thinking like a kid can spur creativity

By Peter Himmelman

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It’s common for adults to feel like we’re drowning in judgment — “You’re not famous enough,” You’re not smart enough,” “You’re not thin enough.” The weight of these appraisals, from others and from ourselves, can prevent us from looking at the world as a child might, as a place of wonder and new possibilities. This, in turn, keeps us from accessing the state of mind that stands at the root of creativity: playfulness.

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When a child is engaged in play, she is taking material from her inner reality, or dreamworld, and placing it into what we might call the real world. Very young children don’t think about the consequences or how they might be perceived; they just play. Studies have shown that when we fully immerse ourselves in joyous doing — as opposed to anxious mulling – we can become more creative.

How can we, as adults, adopt this mindset? Before undertaking a daunting task, spend a few minutes writing a detailed description of what your idea could be in its most beneficial form; that way, you’re primed to think positively, as kids do. Then set a timer and being one small piece of the task, which forces you to act rather than ruminate. To be sure, you may have to assess the kinds of risks that children do not. But more often than not, we tend to stress over imagined threats, not real ones. The more we’re aware of that trap, the easier it is to avoid.

 

Viewed in Time Magazine, October 30, 2016

Peter Himmelman is the founder of Big Muse and the author of Let Me Out: Unlock Your Creative Mind and Bring Your Ideas to Life

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This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Do You Have A Career Portfolio?

240_f_46888137_calhybynkutbp8xlv42olsgduxocjrpm-2A career portfolio is a collection of records in a paper or digital format that describes who you are and what you are capable of doing with much more detail than a resume. Think of it as your individual professional marketing plan.

You can hand pick the records that showcase your professional strengths, interests, and accomplishments and include these documents in your portfolio. These records may include your resume, mission statement, personal goals, graphs, charts, customer service comments/feedback, peer reviews, certifications, licenses, performance evaluations, writing samples/samples of your work, lists of awards, public/community service etc. If done properly, your career portfolio will provide an incredibly complete picture of you as a worker, much more so than a resume could ever do.

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Don’t send your career portfolio to every potential employer or with every resume you send in response to a job lead. If a potential employer shows interest in you, you should send anything from your career portfolio that showcases your skills and indicates that you are the person for the position.

Now, get to it . . .

 

Source: Quick Online Job Search, Michael Farr and The Editors @ JIST, 2011 ed.

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This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Job Search Step 4: Find Job Openings On-Line

In addition to networking for hidden job opportunities, job candidates should also look for jobs posted on formal job boards. Job boards gather job postings from all over the internet, including other job boards and company sites. Job boards enable job seekers to set up profiles to receive notifications via email or text of postings that meet specific search criteria.

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Many employer postings will appear on one or more job boards. Job boards are found online at sites such as Indeed.com, Monster.com, and CareerBuilder.com. Steps for effectively searching for leads on job boards are:

  1. Register with the site as a member in order to receive job notifications.
  2. Upload your resume.
  3. Search for jobs that fit your criteria and save the searches. When new jobs are posted that fit your criteria, the job boards will send you email or text notifications.
  4. Apply for interesting jobs using your uploaded resume.
  5. Upload updated resumes so the job boards have the most recent version.

Search niche boards that cater to specific types of jobs or industries. For example, search ALA JOBLIST at www.joblist.ala.org for positions in the area of Library and Information Science and Technology. To find these specific job boards, go to Job Board Reviews at www.jobboardreviews.com.

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Also search company websites if you have identified a list of target companies. Your list should include at least 30 target companies. Like job boards, many companies post job openings on the career section of their website. These sites allow job seekers to register to receive email notifications of job openings.

Other resources for finding job leads and job search assistance are state and local employment services and agencies, employment agencies, and school and other employment services. Contact your state’s Department of Labor, Unemployment Services, private employment agencies, and temporary agencies for job leads. Connect with local employment service agencies (most offer free services) for career counseling, LinkedIn training, and help drafting resumes and cover letters.

Now, get to it . . .

Source: Quick Online Job Search, Michael Farr and The Editors @ JIST, 2011 ed.

keyThis Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

How Power Posing Can Improve Your Career

BODY LANGUAGE: How A Short ‘Power Pose’ Can Change Your Life and Career, Article by Henry Blodget posted November 19, 2012 (viewed Septermber 18, 2016 on Business Insider).

“Harvard Business School professor Amy Cuddy gave a TED Talk this summer about how tiny changes in your body language can radically change your job performance and career.

“Certain “power poses” immediately change your body chemistry, Professor Cuddy says.

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Lower power pose                VS.                           High power pose

“And these changes help or hurt the way other people perceive you and, importantly, affect the way you actually perform.

“Professor Cuddy concluded her talk with a startling revelation about herself, one that led her to choke up momentarily. Then the talk ended in a standing ovation.”

 

Mr. Blodget then listed Professor’s Cuddy’s key talking points. Below, I’ve listed a few of these talking points:

  1. Body language is the non-verbal communication that can tell us almost everything about what is going on in a given situation such as a interview.
  2. Small gestures, such as a handshake or smile, reveal glimpses of character and shape perceptions about how people are percieved.
  3. One of the most important elements of body language is what is called the “power pose.”
    • In this pose, the person is “opened up” and taking up space. Such as holding your arms over your held in a large “V.”
    • This is the most common high-power poses.
  4. In low power situations, when people feel feeble or helpless, they close up and become small.
    • In this pose, the person hunches over, crosses their arms, and wraps him or herself up.
    • This person takes up little space and closes off from other people.
  5. The “high power” and “low power” poses tend to compliment one another so that it appears  that one person is in charge and the other is not.
    • Professor Cuddy detemined that our nonverbal communication affects how other people think and feel about us.
  6. Professor Cuddy also determined that our nonverbal communications govern how we think and feel about ourselves. In other words, our bodies can change our minds.
    • After a two-minute “high power pose,” the risk tolerance of the high-power posers soared. The risk tolerance of the low-power poses shrank.
    • After a two-minute pose, the testosterone (dominance hormone) levels of the high-power posers rose 20%.After a two-minute pose, the testosterone of the low-power posers fell 10%.
      • After a two-minute “high power pose,” cortisol levels dropped sharply and people were better able to handle stressful situations.  The cortisol levels of the “low-power” people rose.
  7. So, can power posing for a few minutes really change our lives in meaningful ways?
  8. Professor Cuddy found that tbody language is everything. According to Professor Cuddy:
    • Our bodies change our minds
    • and our minds change our behavior
    • and our behavior changes our outcomes.
  9. Professor Cuddy’s message is this . . . FAKE IT ‘TIL YOU BECOME IT.
    • Small changes in body language can change our body chemistry : tiny tweaks result in BIG CHANGES
    • Eventually you will no longer fake strength and confidence because  you will have strength and confidence. You may have started out faking it but eventually you will have it.

CONCLUSION:  Try a power pose before your next interview and see how it makes you feel. Try a power pose every day until your physical presence emotes passion, enthusiasm, confidence, authenticity, and comfort.

BODY LANGUAGE: How A Short ‘Power Pose’ Can Change Your Life and Career, Article by Henry Blodget posted November 19, 2012 (viewed Septermber 18, 2016 on Business Insider).

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This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences and interests with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Power Posing and the Impact on Presence

“‘Power Posing’ Before A Interview Makes You Much More Hireable” by  Max Nisen posted November 23, 2012 (viewed September 18, 2016).

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Harvard Professor Amy Cuddy has found that taking up a short “power pose,” an open and expansive stance, can acutally change body chemistry and make people more confident.

Her new research with Caroline Wilmuth and Dana Carney tests power posing in a real, high-impact social situation: a job interview.

Often, realizing that someone else has power over them, people hunch over their phones before an interview, which makes them feel even more powerless.

In the experiment, subjects that prepared in a different way, by adopting a power pose before a mock interview, got significantly higher scores from evaluators for hireability and performance.

Here’s how the authors sum up their results:

“This experiment demonstrates that preparatory power posing affects individuals’ presence during a job interview, which in turn influences judges’ evaluations and hiring decisions. Compared to low-power posers, high-power posers appeared to better maintain their composure, to project more confidence, and to present more captiving and enthusiastic speeches, which led to higher overall performance evaluations.”

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Many interactions in the workplace have what Cuddy calls “power asymmetry.” One person controls the future of another, which creates an imbalance. “Power posing” is one way that people can change feelings of powerlessness, and get some of the performance advantages that come with being on top.

“‘Power Posing’ Before A Interview Makes You Much More Hireable” by Max Nisen posted November 23, 2012 (viewed September 18, 2016).

keyThis Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences an interests with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Job Search Is All About First Impressions

On your next interview, networking event, or other event in which you will be meeting with people remember that job search is all about impressions. Your

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Viewed on linked on Monday, March 28, 2016.

Original post: https//www/linkedin.com/hp/update/6117433865121325056
bitmoji1895589661This Blog is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

You Are The Boss Of Your Work Happiness

Good days don’t just happen, they are made.

Caroline Webb, an expert in behavioral science and author of the book, How to Have a Good Day, believes that “there is so much people can do to create good moments in every day. Even if you can’t make a really unpleasant job feel wonderful, you can learn to work within the constraints you have to make a situation better.” Source: Cosmopolitan magazine, February 2016.

fotolia_74038494Here are Caroline Webb’s 12 tips for achieving happiness in the workplace:

  1. Start your day by setting an intention. Setting an intention is the process of deciding what you want to achieve, forming a clear picture of it, and then allowing your subconscious to lead you to it. Setting an intention activates your power and energy toward the achievement of your goals.
    • Each morning, think about the day ahead.
    • Acknowledge your feelings — are you grumpy, sad, happy, expectant, etc? — so that you can understand how you are affected by your feelings.
    • Write down your intention so that you can remind yourself of it throughout the day.
  2. Plan a peak. Decide what you are most looking forward to each day, however small or mundane. According to Webb, “small becomes bigger when you think about it.”fotolia_72016274
  3. Imagine your best you. Envision the most important task of the day and picture yourself successfully completing that task. Visualize each step you will take and the potential outcome.
  4. Protect your thinking time. Set aside uninterrupted, distraction-free, time to work on your most complex or difficult task. Group similar activities together, like answering phone calls or responding to emails, working on finances, or preparing for meetings. Complete one activity before moving on to the next. fotolia_84576891
  5. Express appreciation. Compliment or thank someone and tell them why you are praising them. Noticing that you have made someone’s day better will boost your own morale.
  6. Head off work conflicts. Nothing spoils your day like a work interaction gone horribly wrong. Stay calm and acknowledge the other person’s frustration. Offer solutions to resolve the conflict in a way that benefits both of you.
  7. Connect with a friend. Use your time on the bus or train, on a work break, or at lunch to network or connect with other people. You don’t have to meet in person, you can use technology to text, email, or video chat.fotolia_100527985
  8. Fake a good mood. Smiling is the new power pose. According to Webb, breathing slowly and smiling can trick your brain into a better mood.
  9. Label your frustrations. Writing down a problem will help you to move past it. When you feel angry or upset, write out the facts of the situation and how you feel with stark objectivity and honesty. Then read what you have written and decide what your best self would do to resolve the situation.
  10. Get out of your chair. Movement improves mood, memory and focus. Keep it simple – take the stairs, do stretches, walk the long-way to the water fountain or restroom, sit on an exercise ball for an hour, do lunges in your cubicle, etc.  fotolia_94580166
  11. Express gratitude. Identify three things from your day for which you are grateful – no matter how small or mundane. Write them down, tell them to your partner, or simply reflect on them in a quiet moment. You can keep a gratitude journal so that you can look back at all of the things for which you were grateful.
  12. Power down at night. Before bedtime, turn off the screens, put away your phone, and take off the headphones. Take a few minutes to do a calming activity like yoga or a crossword puzzle to wind down before bed so that you sleep restfully and wake refreshed.

You can find more information in Cosmopolitan magazine for February 2016 at pages 161 through 163.

Now, get to it . . .

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This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in Connecticut. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.

Knowing Yourself: Strategies for Resolving Conflict

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Conflicts with co-workers, supervisors, clients, customers, or vendors are not uncommon in the workplace and can be caused by all kinds of issues. The conflicts may be short-lived and easy to resolve, or they might be highly-charged and confrontational disagreements. No mattter the type of conflict, the outcome will be greatly influenced by the way in which you react.

 

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Being able to successfully resolve conflicts should make your interactions at work more productive and enjoyable. Below are several strategies to help you the next time you face a personal or workplace conflict.

  1. Once you have acknowledged a conflict, there are 4 possible options to resolve it:
    • Win-Win: you and the other person both get something you want or need.
    • Win-Lose: You get something you want or need but the other person does not.
    • Lose-Win: You do not get what you want or need but the other person does.
    • Lose-Lose: Neither you nor the other person get what you want or need.
  2. A conflict is only resolved when everyone is satisfied with the outcome. In other words, only a Win-Win option will successfully resolve a conflict.

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Negotiation is required for a win-win solution. That means talking to the person with whom you have a conflict or are in disagreement. Negotiation can be extremely challenging because you may feel strongly about the issue at hand or you may be extremely frustrated with the other person. And the other person may feel the same way.

 

The following are tips to help you work successfully with others to achieve a win-win solution to a conflict that meets the needs or wants of all involved:

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  1. Be calm and objective. Don’t attempt to talk to the person if you are upset. Wait until you are calm and relaxed before trying to resolve the conflict.
  2. Focus on the problem, not on the person. The disagreement is not about the other person, its about something you want or need. Explain the conflict objectively without accusation or supposition. Use explicit details and examples to make your explanation clear.
  3. Listen to the other person’s explanation without judgment or interruption. Really listen to the other person and hear his or her description of the conflict and explanation.
  4. Discuss options for settlement of the conflict. Talk to the other person to try to find a solution so that you both get something you want or need. Recognize that it may not be possible for both of you to get everything that you want. You may need to compromise to reach a win-win solution.
  5. Act on it. Once you idenitfy a win-win solution that is fair and reasonable, put it into practice. Check on the solution to make sure that it continues to meet your needs and wants. If not, negotiate a new or modified solution.

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SUMMARY

  • Acknowledge the conflict. Do not avoid it or denies its existence.
  • Think of ways to approach the conflict that could lead to a win-win solution. A win-win solution is one in which you and the other person both have some of your needs or wants met.
  • Negotiate a win-win solution in a calm and reasonable way. Speak honestly and listen openly and without judgement to the other person.
  • Make sure that the solution you choose continues to work. If necessary, renegotiate to modify the solution or to find another win-win solution.

Now, get to it . . .

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This Blog/Web Site is made available by me, an attorney licensed to practice law in CT. I am not a recruiter, hiring manager, or career agent. Nor am I an expert in any of the areas or issues related to job search activities. I am merely sharing my job search experiences with you. This Blog/Web Site is designed to provide accurate information on the subjects covered but should not be considered professional or legal advice.